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  1. #51
    Moderator shawn alladio's Avatar
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    Blue-You are onto something, I can tell you from training various 'students' that there is a definite channeling of personality types, not always accurate, but it seems to prove that a certain 'mindset' is needed to cope/work under pressure in emotional/stressful situations...hence the comment 'oh he's a fireman' or 'he's a cop' with eyes rolling and a chuckle usually tells a story..LOL

  2. #52
    Moderator shawn alladio's Avatar
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    Dramatic Coast Guard Helicopter Rescue Delivers Surfer to Safety (VIDEO)

    Salem-News.com The surfer was safely rescued from a cove near Otter Rock.


    Photo and video courtesy: U.S. Coast Guard

    (DEPOE BAY, Ore.) - The Coast Guard rescued a surfer Sunday who became stranded by strong currents in a cove south of Depoe Bay, Oregon. The call came into the Lincoln County, Oregon 911 Dispatch Center at 1:41 PM.
    They in turn contacted the Coast Guard to report a surfer in distress near Devil's Punch Bowl State Park. This is in an area known as Otter Rock which is probably the most frequently surfed spot on the central Oregon coast.
    Minutes later, an HH-65 Dolphin Helicopter crew From Coast Guard Air Station North Bend, Oregon, and a 47-foot motor lifeboat crew from Coast Guard Station Depoe Bay, were launched to assist.
    Coast Guard officials say that at 2:05 PM, the helicopter aircrew hoisted the surfer to safety and transported him to waiting emergency medical technicians in Newport, Oregon.
    No injuries were reported.
    Large waves along the Washington and Oregon State coast attract many surfers, and the sport has seen tremendous growth over the last two decades.
    But the Coast Guard reminds everyone that these seemingly ideal conditions can also place surfers in great danger. Strong rip currents can sweep surfers out to sea. Other currents can push surfers into coves or sea caves, leaving them stranded or vulnerable to rising tides.
    While not discouraging the sport, the Coast Guard encourages surfers to exercise extreme caution when surfing in the Pacific Northwest.
    Special thanks to the Coast Guard and YouTube for this dramatic video segment:
    Video




    http://www.salem-news.com/articles/february122008/surfer_rescue_2-12-08_.php

  3. #53
    AlaskaMike's Avatar
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    Communications

    Here's the first of the Seven Critical Skills of Team Coordination Training: Communication.

    The CG's stated goals of this module are:
    1) Identify the parts of Shannon's communications model.
    2) State the barriers to effective communications.
    3) Define active listening
    4) Describe how using proper orders and standard terminology may enhance safety and mission success.

    ....I'm betting the first question you might be asking yourself is: "How in the world does this apply to me??" Good question. I'll try and adapt the information to make it as applicable to the PWC rider(s) as possible.

    I'll start out with Shannon's communication model. Essentially, the model describes communications as being a circle; from message (sender intended) to feedback (listener percieved). Without getting too far into the weeds, as a 'sender', I assume that I am sending out a message that I understand 100%. For example, I want you to follow me through a narrow canal area rather than the two of us riding side by side. So, I gesture; pointed to you, then pointing behind me and yelling the words, "Follow me!"....pretty simple message. And, you respond (feedback) with a nod and fall into a trail formation. TADAH! Communication worked!

    As sender, I assumed that you got 100% of my message. As reciever, you acknowleged reciept of the message and responded as I expected.

    How about when the message isn't recieved correctly? We know that vocal tone accounts for 55% and body language accounts for 38% effectiveness in sending messages. Typically, (as recievers) we actually 'get' about 7% of the messages people send. Obviously, most messages sent are much more complex than our scenario...remember the game you may have played in grade school where a long message was whispered down a line of students and by the time it got to the last student, it hardly even resembled the original message? Remember the 100% sent and 7% recieved? That equates to a 93% gap in communications. If the comms loop (Shannon's model) stays closed and the feedback doesn't confirm the message, then the sender normally tries again (rephrasing, resending, different body language, etc.) You can observe this every day/any day in your life where there is human interaction...and it isn't just the words that are commonly misunderstood, it's actions/body language, tone of voice or even a raised eyebrow! In fact, facial expressions are a primary means of communications in humans.

    How about barriers to communications? ...the list is long! Common barriers are sometimes very obvious; cultural/language differences, anger or frustration, distractions, tunnel vision, interupptions, personal bias, etc...the list goes on.

    How do you communicate with your riding partner? Hand signals? Have you developed your own 'language'? When I ride with my wife, she only needs to give me a 'look' and I know exactly what she's thinking (the results of having been married for 35 years!)....but that doesn't work when I'm riding with someone else. How do we communicate effectively? First, we use the same hand signals that diver's use (attached) with some minor variations...and we all train the same way. Obviously, effective non-verbal communications are critical on PWC's.

    I'll touch just a bit more on communications in another post, then move onto the next module. Mike
    Attached Files Attached Files

  4. #54
    Moderator shawn alladio's Avatar
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    Groovy Mike!
    I'm going to forward this on my newsletter..I took the TCT course in '99 I think at the 11th district....really good stuff! Thanks for sharing that!
    Awesome!
    Shawn

  5. #55
    AlaskaMike's Avatar
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    Module #2 - Situational Awareness

    Actually, there really isn't a particular order to do TCT, I'm being fairly arbitrary with the sequence of modules....

    To recap Communications: Simply remember that everybody communicates and most of us aren't very effective at it (we know what we said, why didn't you understand??) Communications is a loop and barriers that prevent the loop from continuing untill communications are completed/no longer needed can stop the process cold. Listening is a developed skill (i.e. NOT NATURAL!) and anyone can improve their listening skills; it's key to effective comms.

    Second lesson: Situational Awareness (SA)

    This is one of the biggies...you always hear about accidents where, "He lost situational awareness..." and the situation goes south very quickly. The objectives in this module are to:
    State the actions required to maintain situational awareness.
    State the clues to loss of situational awareness.
    Define the five barriers to situational awareness.
    Describe the three levels of human error.

    By definition, Situational Awareness is the ability to identify, process, and comprehend the critical elements of information about what is happening to the team with regards to the mission. More simply, it's knowing what is going on around you.

    Navigational mishaps for boats show that 40% are due to loss of situational awareness. This is a critical skill for PWC riders partly because of the very nature of the craft; loss of SA will bite you hard and very quickly. Some clues to a loss of SA:
    • Confusion or gut feeling
    • No one watching or looking for hazards
    • Use of improper procedures
    • Departure from regulations
    • Failure to meet planned targets
    • Unresolved discrepancies
    • Ambiguity
    • Fixation or preoccupation
    Naturally, I recognize that some of the terminology might not be readily apparent as to the intent of the description to forum readers (the terminology used commonly by the military becomes a barrier to communications when used with non-military) ....so, lets just take "Unresolved discrepancies" for example. What does that really mean to the 19 year old maniac/idiot on Lake Havasu on a sunny afternoon? How about this scenario? Our resident maniac/idiot is blasting along the shoreline and sees some people walking along one of those points that have the little lighthouses on them. Our m/i is focused on zooming around the point of land when his ski 'hiccups' and then runs normally again (Unresolved discrepancy)...so, he continues holding the throttle down and just as he turns to starboard at 50 mph, the #1 piston grenades and the engine siezes. The nose dips and our intrepid m/i is ejected into the air and joins the landlubbers on the spit...only it's not pretty. When the engine hesitated, continuing on at full speed isn't always the right thing to do....certainly a hard turn at speed near land combined with an untimely engine failure all lead to the injury. Oh, before I start getting "hate mail" about the maniac/idiot description, please allow me to describe what I call a maniac...A maniac is anyone going faster that I am and an idiot is anyone going slower. It's how I judge my speed in traffic; if there are more maniacs than idiots, I'm going too slow. More idiots than maniacs and I'm going too fast.

    Back to SA:

    Effective communications may be the most important factor in achieving and maintaining situational awareness. Ask anyone who has experienced the wrong end of a gun in a tense situation; they'll tell you that the muzzle looked as big as a howitzer...and they saw little else. The effects of the sudden onrush of adrenaline can cause 'tunnel vision'...it is an actual physical effect with 'greying' around the visual periphery and the brain focuses on what it percieves to be the most important 'threat'. Definitely a barrier to SA!

    Time for me to head home tonite so I'll be back later! Mike

  6. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue 182 View Post
    I know I must be careful digressing on such an important thread but I just read this article "Keeping Love Alive" in 2/08/08 issue of Wall Street Journal and it illustrates perfectly my comments regarding implications of cutting edge brain MRI technology. I am deeply skeptical that MRIs reliably diagnose human emotion or character but I also know the Wall Street Journal is no pop psychology rag. Can you imagine the implications? No reason to ask your spouse or mate if he/she still loves you. You can just ask for a functional brain MRI to prove it! In the coming decade, in addition to your other family advisers, may be good to have your own neuroradiologist on retainer!
    I don't have any of those.....I live day by Day...If I want it, I'll take it. Are you ready for Catalina? Where you nice to our sister "Shawn" while I was away stealing trophies and Taking care of buss. ...? ....Jammer 1
    Last edited by Jammer 1; 03-02-2008 at 03:52 PM.

  7. #57
    Moderator shawn alladio's Avatar
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    I was in Japan thinking about the 300....

    Racers, what is your occupation???????

    Just got back, but I'm off for another hectic trainin tour....argh..no time for anything right now...

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by shawn alladio View Post
    I was in Japan thinking about the 300....

    Racers, what is your occupation???????

    Just got back, but I'm off for another hectic trainin tour....argh..no time for anything right now...
    I wish you were there. They needed sombody like you to design a better safe enviroment for both the Score board officials and the racers. They stoped the race on the 27th lap. a GPR 1300 run head on straight to the scoreboard pontoon knocking the main girl that is incharge of all the lap times and scores. she got taken to the hospital. she's OK. game over.

  9. #59
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shawn alladio View Post
    46 Year Old Female:
    My first hit was 0.421
    second 0.328
    third 0.328
    fourth 0.328
    fifth 0.313
    My final reaction time was: 0.3436
    http://getyourwebsitehere.com/jswb/rttest01.html
    I couldn't believe it, 2.19 for all 5 tries...I just can't believe I couldn't improve my time in 5 tries.

  10. #60
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    Second time I bested with a 2.03...good enough for this old man.


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