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  1. #21
    [quote=shawn alladio;524799]well, being female and all... I would put on the rescue tube leash across his shoulder as a strap, have him attach it to the bow loop strap, and start swimming me out of there as I sit comfortably on top of the seat, while he works, huffs and puffs, becuase he is a gentlemen..../quote]

    You know, I actually do think I'm a gentleman most of the time. However, a man must know his limitations! I am not competetive in that way. I would have no pride! I would remark how fortunate I was to be in the care of such an impeccably trained athlete, fuss and putter a bit about the cold, AND HAND YOU THE SWIM FINS while I poured myself a cup of cocoa!


  2. #22
    AK Mike, I posted before I read your reply. That was very informative. I really like being able to swim from boat but I know those waters can be treacherous. One of the most frightening extreme videos Ive seen was of scuba-spelunkers. They climb down into caves and then swim through narrow passages way underground. Gives me the willies!

    Shawn, I just read an earlier post where you mentioned not being "certified." I am willing to help train you but we must start with your mind. The guy who gives the test is pretty strict so no missed classes.

  3. #23
    AlaskaMike's Avatar
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    Scenario #2

    Here's the next scene:

    You are blissfully cruising along at 30 mph, the ski is purring and the water is glass. Sun is shining, a few clouds and Creedence is on the iPod. (did I give my age away again?). Suddenly, without warning, a humpback whale surfaces only 30 feet in front of you! You instinctively crank the bars hard to port and because you've got lots of experience on the ski, you don't let off the throttle, so the boat gets a good bite and you think for a split second that you'll clear the whale just by inches. Unfortunately for you, the whale is headed directly away from you and when he surfaced for air, his tail was still underwater and directly underneath you! You feel yourself going airborne and time seems to run in slow motion (actually, your brain is running at hyper speed, so time seems to slow down). You are sideways in the air and you know that it's time to separate yourself from the machine, so you instinctively kick out. The problem is that your leg is twisted and your foot is deep in the footwell. You feel rather than hear the snap of a spiral fracture and know that your ankle is broken. Shock sets in quickly and even before you hit the water, you know not to kick with your legs. You surface and your leg goes immediately numb. Your breath comes in short gasps, but you quickly gain control and assess your situation. Your ski is too far away to reach easily and the current is picking up and you are getting even farther away. Fortunately for you, you've planned well ahead and carry all the basic survival gear on/in your vest, including an EPIRB and handheld VHF radio. Which will likely be the gear that facilitates your rescue and why? Incidentally, you are wearing a drysuit, gloves and helmet along with your PFD and other safety gear which includes pyro (flares, smoke and dye marker). The boat traffic is pretty light and from your vantage point low in the water, you can't see any other boats. Mike

  4. #24
    Moderator shawn alladio's Avatar
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    [quote=Blue 182;524835]
    Quote Originally Posted by shawn alladio View Post
    well, being female and all... I would put on the rescue tube leash across his shoulder as a strap, have him attach it to the bow loop strap, and start swimming me out of there as I sit comfortably on top of the seat, while he works, huffs and puffs, becuase he is a gentlemen..../quote]

    You know, I actually do think I'm a gentleman most of the time. However, a man must know his limitations! I am not competetive in that way. I would have no pride! I would remark how fortunate I was to be in the care of such an impeccably trained athlete, fuss and putter a bit about the cold, AND HAND YOU THE SWIM FINS while I poured myself a cup of cocoa!
    YOU are a hero to all men! LOL
    Well said!
    LOL

  5. #25
    Shawn, I definitely cant claim that title. My Ultra only goes 68 in flat calm with custom rideplate (but she is a force in the straightline chop and all weather to boot).

    The injury scenario is scary too. It can change everything. I'm curious to see what others might say.

  6. #26
    AK Mike, must clarify, what CCR tune exactly? Id guess Comin Up Around the Bend? When you come down here I may download some Metallica for you just to round out your experience.

    I hope to never be in this position either. My answer is simply hit every help button you got and try and stand the pain. Coping with serious injury alone has got to be one of the toughest things to do.

    This scenario does cause me to revisit the issue of a tether. In narrow circumstances, it may make sense if it can be rigged correctly. Chance of survival must be much better on ski with extra clothes, food and water.

    We have a ton of jellyfish all over the local waters. Mild toxin compared to boxes though. Wetsuit is good protection here. I sucked up a twig and went dead in water last time I putterred around taking photos of an enormous herd of em. So, I didnt get stung but they still found a way to get me!

  7. #27
    AlaskaMike's Avatar
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    CCR

    Blue: I'm listening to that very tune right now! It's funny how music brings back some strong memories; tunes from the late 60's/early 70's remind me of some pretty good times. CCR is special to me because I had an 8-track (remember those?) and we cruised the six-lane, stoplight to stoplight racing in Waterloo, Iowa (Highway 21. You could buy 98 octane at the pumps and the old high-compression V8's loved that stuff...and it was cheap! I remember paying .25 a gallon driving my '69 Camaro listening to Creedence on a warm summer evening, sitting at a stoplight with my left arm on the windowsill listening to solid lifters clicking away. Everyone would line up and when the light went green, we'd all race to the next light....I usually did pretty good, the Camaro would pull the front wheels with 7 inch slicks....didn't get beat very often.

    Back to scenario #2...you are exactly right, use everything you have. With such a low profile, the VHF might be ineffective (line-of-sight) but worth a shout anyway. I'd light off the EPIRB and a smoke....both should get attention! The flares aren't nearly as effective on a bright day since they get lost in the glare, but the smoke will put up a huge cloud that can be seen for miles on a clear day. The dye marker is very effective for aircraft and can be spotted quite some distance as well. The injury definitely compounds the complexity of the situation and is usually creates enough concern/panic that people might make poor decisions...although, I've seen people injured that remain calmer than the rescuers many times!

    I'll start working on #3. Mike

  8. #28
    AlaskaMike's Avatar
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    #3

    (This one's for you, Blue!)

    You are meeting some friends in Roche Harbor and trailer your ski up to Anacortes. It's fairly early on a spring day and promises to be a nice ride. You launch at Cap Sante and cruise around through the San Juans and plan on passing through the narrow, rocky cut between Orcas and Shaw Islands - no problem because you've got your GPS and the ski can get through easily....whoops, looks like there's a little of that early morning fog low on the water...no problem though, you're less than 10 miles from Roche Harbor and you can see the outline of San Juan Island, so you continue on. Five minutes later, you can't see your hand in front of your face! The fog settled almost instantly and you got caught! What are you going to do? Mike

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaMike View Post

    I've seen people injured that remain calmer than the rescuers many times!

    Mike
    My worst physical injury so far happened about 8 yrs ago in a small town in Oregon, close to where Shawn recently took her spill in 40ftrs.

    I was playin touch football though. I thought I could go through this 240lb guy. Ankle buckled and I heard a snap. Double displaced ankle fracture. I lay there on the ground and knew I was in deep trouble. My adult friends milled around saying things like "Gawd that looks bad." "Wow, that must hurt."

    My 5yr old daughtr and friend's 3 yr old boy sat down in the grass next to me though with no panic in their face. I focused on the goal of not yelling or swearing. I did pull up huge clumps of the sod all around me. I knew the time would come soon enough when my high top sneaker would have to be removed and ankle reset.

    I know the book you mentioned about intangible factors that may determine whether someone lives or dies in the wild. One of the chapters discusses a 13 yr old girl who fell from an airplane into the South American jungle. In her particular situation, the girl's youth and inexperience may have paradoxically saved her life. I'm going to read the rest of that book now!
    Last edited by Blue 182; 02-01-2008 at 02:50 AM. Reason: Typo

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaMike View Post
    You are meeting some friends in Roche Harbor and trailer your ski up to Anacortes. It's fairly early on a spring day and promises to be a nice ride. You launch at Cap Sante and cruise around through the San Juans... Mike
    AK Mike, another good scenario. Heavy fog is always possible here so I want to pursue this. I must stop you now though. Remember, its San Juan County, with .02% of the state's population, that decided the other 99.98% of citizens who may wish to ride PWCs there, cannot.

    For your scenario to work, we would have to be in full stealth mode but still risk heavy fine. Or we could just pack a 100 mph jet boat with teenagers and turn them loose off Orcas Island because SJ County is ok with that.

    Sorry, I have to get my shots in whenever I can. I will rethink scenario imagining a location where the Constitution means something, ie anyplace besides SJ County.

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