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  1. #1

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    Sank my Ultra 260X today please help

    So, got a late start this summer and put my 2010 Ultra 260X in the lake today. Drove it back to the dock and tied it up knowing we would come back in a bit to ride. Came back an hour later and it was 3/4 underwater! I jumped in and got it to shore and started draining it. Apparently I lost one of the drain covers or never put it back after winterizing. DUH!

    Anyway, back on dry land and at the house. Pumped out as much water as I could and then pulled spark plugs. Turned engine over several times and got water shooting out. Did this for a bit and also shot compressed air through the spark plug openings and got some water coming through the exhaust. Cycled until I was just getting small mists of water and then put plugs back in and tried starting. Turned over and then died. Took plugs out again and repeated cycling with more bursts of water coming out the spark plug holes. Put plugs in again and turned over then died.

    I can't seem to get all the water out this way and am not sure how to remove and drain the intake? I'm guessing I remove a bunch of water and then as soon as I start the engine it pulls more water from the intake or somewhere else and fills the engine again. I need to stop the source of water and I think the only place it could be hiding is in the intake. Anyone have a picture showing where this is and how to remove?

    I did check the oi and it looks good right now, but I'm going to change it anyway after getting it running.

    Anyway, DOUBLE CHECK you drain plugs!

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    steve45's Avatar
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    I've never messed with a 260, but after looking at the parts diagram, I'd pull the hoses off the intake to get the water out of there. Keep working on it! This is like doing CPR on your 'Ski! You may have to open up the electrical box(es) and get the water out of there, too!

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    I've never messed with a 260, but after looking at the parts diagram, I'd pull the hoses off the intake to get the water out of there. Keep working on it! This is like doing CPR on your 'Ski! You may have to open up the electrical box(es) and get the water out of there, too!
    Thanks. I was looking for the electrical stuff but no luck yet. Anyone have a parts diagram for this engine that they could post? I searched online and wasn't able to find anything.

  4. #4
    steve45's Avatar
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    It's probably like the Ultra 300 & 310 models where the electrical stuff is behind the front storage compartment, under the handlebars.

    You can find a parts diagram by clicking on the blue button near the top of this page that says 'OEM Parts'.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    It's probably like the Ultra 300 & 310 models where the electrical stuff is behind the front storage compartment, under the handlebars.

    You can find a parts diagram by clicking on the blue button near the top of this page that says 'OEM Parts'.

    Thanks. I found diagrams for an "Intake Silencer" and "Intercooler". I'm guessing these are the parts that I should be disconnecting hoses from and checking for water? I just don't know a lot about engines and want to make sure that I'm tackling the part where the water is being introduced to the system. So pull hoses and start cleaning them out?



  6. #6
    steve45's Avatar
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    Yes. Mark them so you put them back together in the right places.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    Yes. Mark them so you put them back together in the right places.
    Ok, so I opened up the hoses I could reach and cleaned them out blowing compressed air and then used a long extraction hose and pumped about 1 gallon of water out what I believe is the intercooler. Was able to turn the engine over several times and after each time I sucked more water out of the spark plug holes. Now I am at the point where I can cucle the engine a few times and the spark plug holes are bone dry.

    Now I am on to oil and filter changing. Drained the oil and it was as expected sort of a milky / latte color. Added new oil and changed the filter and ran the engine for 1 minute. Started draining the oil and it is still off color. So, I'm going to drain it and clean the oil filter and do another full oil change and possible another until I get clean oil.

    It starts strong and sounds pretty good, although I did get a little bit of white smoke out the exhaust which was a bit scary, but I think is okay.

    Is there anything else that I am missing? Hoping to do a few more oil changes and then take it for a spin. When back on the water is it best to just put around for a while with very little throttle, or should I ride it like normal and give it open throttle a few times to try and clear any residual water out? Appreciate any insight on this. Fingers crossed that I can save the ski otherwise this is a majorly expensive Darwin lesson!


  8. #8

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    Sorry to hear about your ordeal but I think you have done all you can. Only time will tell. I flipped and sank my 2020 STX160 in saltwater with 2 hours on it. A call to a few dealers said 2 weeks before they could get to it. One offered advice on what to do, vacuum all the oil out and this will have to be done many times. I went with Walmart oil since I knew it was $13 per gallon and cycled through about 7 oil change a few Marvel Mystery before I was happy with the result. Final oil change was Kawasaki oil and filter And new spark plugs. Yes, I had to remove the airbox and blow/drain all the water out. 2 years later and 20+ plus hours, all good thus far. Still keeping fingers crossed.

  9. #9
    steve45's Avatar
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    Samish, I think you done good by taking quick action. A 4-stroke should have a better chance at surviving submersion because that is very little clearance between parts and they're coated with oil. A 2-stroke has ball and needle bearings that are essentially open to let water wash away the little oil that is there.

    Two items that may suffer are the supercharger (I would fog the hell out of that) and I don't know how to inspect it without disassembly. Also the cam shafts, but since it wasn't completely submerged I think you'll be OK there. It's easy enough to remove the cylinder head cover and take a look. It will give you an opportunity to check the valve clearance while you have it opened up.

    I wouldn't run it real hard just yet. You want to run it hard enough to vaporize any residual water that's in the engine. I'd carry a paddle and a tow rope (which I always do anyway), stay close to shore, and go out with a buddy for a couple of hours until you're certain that it's OK.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post

    Two items that may suffer are the supercharger (I would fog the hell out of that) and I don't know how to inspect it without disassembly. Also the cam shafts, but since it wasn't completely submerged I think you'll be OK there. It's easy enough to remove the cylinder head cover and take a look. It will give you an opportunity to check the valve clearance while you have it opened up.
    Ok, so I did 6 oil changes and then took it out for a spin. I ran it about 15 minutes and varied from idling (1350-1400rpm) along to throttling up to about 5000rpm which put me around 25 mph. Everything seemed to be like normal. I did not do any heavy throttle yet.

    Do I run it easy a few more times and gradually up the throttle?

    Do I need to do another oil change after having it running in the water (which is much different than just running it in the driveway)?

    I do not have a fog port on this engine, so not sure how I would go about fogging the supercharger?

    Lastly any tips on how to dry out the seats which are now water logged

    Thank you for the positive feedback and suggestions. I don't know what I would have done without the assistance provided here in the forum!

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