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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by WaterDR View Post
    Funny how there is so much conflicting info on this. I have spoken to three different dealers and they all do something different.
    The topic of laying up a PWC draws a lot of opinions because there are so many variables and no way to test the outcome so people do what they feel "good" about doing.

    Here's my opinions:
    -Fogging is necessary because unlike any other machine with an internal combustion engine, there is standing water in the exhaust system. There is no way to prove if all of it has been removed so a humid environment could be present in the vicinity of the exhaust valves and internal components.

    -I don't believe in filling the fuel tank because a PWC fuel system does not have an open vent. There is a check valve that must be overcome with operating differential pressures so during lay-up the chance of introducing ambient air is nil.

    -I use antifreeze only if the owners manual specifies it. My '98 GTX-RFI requires it because the cylinders are laid down and trap cooling water and there is a heat exchanger on the bottom of the crankcase. On my "17 and '18 four strokes the engine cooling system is closed loop so the only need is to blow water out of the exhaust/intercooler loop.


  2. #22
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pro1200 View Post
    … there are so many variables …



    -I don't believe in filling the fuel tank because a PWC fuel system does not have an open vent.
    There is a check valve that must be overcome with operating differential pressures …
    If the range of ambient temperature change during storage is large enough the pressure differential can cause the check valve to vent. I agree that PWC fuel tanks probably vent a lot less often and certainly with less accumulated effect on the fuel than typical marine boat fuel tanks with open vents.

    There are other factors that may argue against storage with a low fuel level inside the PWC fuel tank. Some fuel pumps with steel pump housings may rust when exposed to air inside the fuel tank. Maintaining a ‘mostly full’ fuel level submerges the fuel pump in fuel, presumably limiting the risk of corrosion.

    The fuel may degrade ‘naturally’ while sitting in storage. A larger quantity of fuel in the tank may be more stable over time as there is less air/oxygen (as a ratio) for the fuel volume to react with.

    If ethanol fuel is in the tank then the concerns about hygroscopic properties and related downside effects increase. A mostly full fuel tank can ‘absorb’ more water contaminate volume than a smaller amount of fuel.

    The flip side is that storing PWC with full or mostly full fuel tanks means that should the PWC become involved in a fire (even if the fire started with something else) there is more fuel present.

    And of course come springtime the ‘old’ fuel must be consumed by the engine before much ‘fresh gasoline’ can be added to the tank. Riding in a moderate manner (in terms of engine demand for fuel octane) until the old fuel is mostly gone is my approach.

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  4. #23
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pro1200 View Post
    … people do what they feel "good" about doing.

    Indeed. Very much so.

  5. #24
    TJBrad04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptscon View Post
    If you don't feel like fogging just start it up for 10 seconds once a month.
    This!! if you are storing indoors just add appropriate amount of stabilizer

  6. #25
    TXDroneRacer's Avatar
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    I was doing some research and found yet another Yamalube product.

    Label says "Additive: Fuel Stabilizer & Conditioner Plus"
    Amazon has these for about $20 per 32/oz bottle.
    I also read somewhere online that the user should add one oz per gallon of fuel.

    Do you guys think this Fuel Stabilizer is a good idea? I can't imagine that it would hurt, but does it bring value?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #26
    TXDroneRacer's Avatar
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    I live in the Houston area and store my skis in an insulated garage. My garage will not go below freezing. I have a generator for long periods of power loss. My garage did not freeze last year during the crazy storm.

    With regards to keeping the pistons and valves lubricated during the winter, I plan on connecting the hose to the skis and running them for five minutes per month. We plan on using the skis in November, but not in December, January or February. Not sure about March. It may be too cold on the lake in March. I am on the fence about fogging the engine. I am following this thread and may end up doing something like that.

    I think adding a fuel stabilizer is probably a good idea.

    I have "Battery Tender Plus" that I plan to use for the batteries.

    I have plans to work on both skis during the winter anyways... I definitely need to correct the ribbon issue and upgrade the intake.

  8. #27
    mittens's Avatar
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    TXDroneRacer

    how do you have a avitar that swaps?

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  10. #28
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mittens View Post
    … I use air compressor and blow from the pissers to blow out … water in the oil cooler, and motor.
    purges a good amount out of all the lines, Oil cooler, motor, and intercooler.

    all comes out the pump. ...


    Are you seeing more water expelled than what this video shows?

    I understand you are blowing air into the small hull water exit fittings (Intercooler on one side, oil cooler on the other.

    How are you forcing air into the engine cooling system, rather than just dumping out the jet pump via the X or Y connector?
    Are you seeing water forced out of the engine water exit in the transom?

  11. #29
    mittens's Avatar
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    Interesting the video talks about tow valves. I have just that. and yes I see more water then that. Granted I don't have factory cooling either. The water feed from the rectifier is probably 5 foot of hose that hangs down in the bilge. So that's a large low point on my ski. and my Intercooler has a extra 1-2 foot for the flush and valve I have set up.

    I have a main tow valve on main coolant line. So when flushing that system, I blow though flush hose with valve open (some to motor some to pump)... then Shut valve and blow through whole motor, then gets the oil cooler, rectifier, exhaust manifold and comes out the main water exit at the transom too. Then some from pisser all the way for fun.

    My intercooler/fizzle set up is dedicated line, but the Flush port T and the tow valve are in between the fizzle and pisser... This allows me to shut the valve and BACK Flush the intercooler when flushing.. so I blow it out with valve closed pushing all to the jet pump, and then open to clear anything left on either side. Then some from pisser all the way for fun.

    My Turbo coolent line has another tow valve between through hull and Flush T . So I flush from the flush port with valve shut. clearing out all water and then open valve and do it again to clear anything in the 2 foot to pump too. I still have to fix my to hot side pipes as I need the water bungs on both those on bottom an the whole turbo side will self drain 100 % as it is now I have 2 pockets that hold.. (welder did not do exactly as requested and will be addressed this winter)

  12. #30
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mittens View Post
    … I don't have factory cooling …
    That is the salient aspect.

    For factory stock cooling configurations, the Yamaha water system is essentially self-draining, especially if the bow is tilted upwards and the engine throttle is firmly blipped several times. What remains is small amounts of water in a few places where freeze damage is not likely.

    After the self-draining is complete, the Yamaha hull can be stored level, but I prefer to park it with the bow tilted upwards, as much as the trailer tongue jack will provide.

    The water ejected as shown in my video would be coming from those small water pockets, shallow hose sags, that sort of thing.

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