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  1. #1

    Sat Nav Recommendation

    Hello,

    The choices of satnav seem to be quite overwhelming and I don't want to just get what Seadoo or Yamaha or their dealer want to sell me.

    I require:

    1. When I set off, click (tap) my position to mark my home/return point.
    2. Click where I want to get to, and the screen then directs me there (without me setting a course)
    3. Maps loaded to show me the coastlines (I am primarily riding Long Island NY) so the bays/sound/sea.
    4. Warn me if I'm going into an area with hazards or speed restrictions (not essential, but nice to have)
    5. Really easy to view when out in the sun.

    I will fish sometimes but I'm not sure how useful/important a fish finder is on a PWC.

    Where should I start looking?

    thanks,

  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    I currently use a Garmin 9 inch screen size chartplotter.
    http://greenhulk.net/forums/showthre...=1#post3141457

    Screen size is an important factor. My previous Garmin was seven inch display and before that some smaller models. A friend used to tell me his five inch Garmin was ‘big enough’. He recently upgraded to a nine inch model.



    As the screen gets larger the overall unit weight increases and the mounting method must be robust. These things really get jerked around when riding fast on rough water - the mount must not only be strong but also fairly stiff, otherwise the screen will wobble as you ride, making it more difficult to read at speed.

    I find the larger screen makes it much easier to read chart details and also be able to see the route ahead without zooming in and out frequently. Small chart markings such as ‘rock’ are important to notice, yet the icon may only be a few pixels in size.

    Garmin does support auto-routing to destination but that feature requires the marine chart to also support the feature. Previous Garmin models with built-in charts did not necessarily support auto-routing - one needed to buy an enhanced/upgraded chart from Garmin. I do not know whether the charts included with the current Garmin models support auto-routing to destination.

    Overall I like my Garmin but some aspects of the user interface are clunky and can be frustrating.

    I have not compared the recent models of competing marine chartplotter brands.
    I suppose I should, but it is not easy to properly evaluate these things in a dealer showroom, with the unit unmoving.

    No chartplotter is designed with a focus on PWC operation, these are made for use on boats. When riding on a PWC there are limitations that differ from boat use. There are times when it is not possible to let go of the handlebars to press a button, both hands are needed to hang onto the ski.

    For example, my Garmin will sometimes pop up a warning about something ahead, which blocks more than half the chart from view. And it will keep that warning until I press the OK button. But I am going 60mph across rough water so pressing any buttons is not going to happen. If I want to see the entire chart I must first slow down enough to lift a hand and poke the OK button, which is also moving about as the hull and my pointer finger bounce around. So it can take several pokes to actually hit the button.

    I could turn off ALL warnings, but then I will not know about them.

    I mount the Garmin near the left side handgrip as my right hand is for throttle control. I often change view modes and zoom levels while riding along. I use my left hand for this.

  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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  5. #4
    Thanks K447 for your comprehensive replies - really appreciated. I'm going to study all of the info you've given and the styles you mention. The points you make about sturdy mounting seem really prudent. Seadoo do sell some Garmin models so I'll study what the 'factory mount' preference is.

  6. #5
    I note in your photos you're fully dressed in dry suit etc. - is that for winter/cold or you just like to stay dry? What time of year (and location) do you dress like that? I've only ever riden when it's warm or hot but once I own my own bike, I'll want to use it 10/12 months if I can bear it.

  7. #6
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandBrit View Post
    I note in your photos you're fully dressed in dry suit etc. - is that for winter/cold or you just like to stay dry? What time of year (and location) do you dress like that?

    I've only ever riden when it's warm or hot but once I own my own bike, I'll want to use it 10/12 months if I can bear it.
    Dry suit for riding on really cold water, wet suits for less cold water. Warm clothing underneath, especially on the legs.

    Long John neoprene wet suit with long sleeve wet suit jacket for cool days, shorty wet suit for warmer days.

    Tip: If you can find a wet suit that is not black or really dark color, that is better. Black gets really hot when you stop riding and are just floating while in full sunshine. And should you end up in the water it is easier for others to find you if you are wearing brighter colors, not dark black.

    In the photo you can see the water temp shown on the Garmin screen. 4 degrees C.

    We ride around this region of Canada from April through to the beginning of November, typically.

    Tip: Always dress for the water temperature, not just the air temps.

    If you get ejected and cannot reboard immediately you can quickly succumb to the effects of hypothermia. Just climbing back on board can become very difficult once the cold starts to sink into your muscles.

    This is especially applicable to early season PWC riding when the air may become quite comfortable on some days but the water has yet to properly warm up. In my region that liquid water I am riding over may have been solid ice just three months ago!

    And if the ejection causes you to be injured you may not be able to pull yourself back out. So you will be in the water until someone else helps you.

    http://greenhulk.net/forums/showthre...=1#post3119519



    Riding in the shoulder and off-seasons means you must be more self-reliant. There will be few or no other boaters around to assist if a problem occurs.

    One must also be prepared for self-rescue. Carry gear to solve problems, everything from hose clamps to tow ropes, flashlight and a tool kit.

    https://www.northernontario.travel/b...watercraft-pwc

    http://greenhulk.net/forums/showthre...=1#post3146606
    Last edited by K447; 10-16-2021 at 02:17 PM.


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