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  1. #1

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    Winterization fuel question

    Hi!

    I'm going through the winterization / storage process in the manual for my 2010 Ultra 260 and am struggling with the fuel. The manual says to remove any existing fuel with a pump. I have tried 3 different attachments and can't get the lines down far enough to get to the remaining 2 -3 gallons or so in the tank. I'm supposed to pump this out and then add approximately 2 gallons of fresh fuel and then run the engine several times until the new fuel is picked up into the system and then turn it off and pump out any remaining fuel.

    Since I can't get any hoses or tubes down far enough into the tank, would it be better to leave the 93 octane fuel in there (2-3 gallons) or add some non ethanol 89 octane fuel (only non octane available in my area)?

    I just don't want to screw anything up or introduce moisture. The ski will be inside a non heated but insulated garage for the winter up in the Northwest where it will get quite humid.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Yikes, that is quite the onerous storage preparation process!

    I have a feeling that the complete process shown in the Owner’s Manual is almost never done, especially when just prepping for a few months of winter.

    The storage preparation process outlined below is quite thorough and would be more appropriate prior to a very long term storage, a year or more before the next use.

    From the online Kawasaki 2010 Jet Ski Ultra 260X Owner’s Manual
    https://www.kawasaki-onlinetechinfo....0&lang_code=EN






  3. #3

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    Yeah, that is the process I'm following and it says to drain the fuel when storing the jetski. I just don't know how problematic it is if you are unable to get all the fuel out.

  4. #4
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samish260 View Post
    … that is the process I'm following … how problematic it is …
    Well, give us some info.

    How long do you intend to have it in storage?

    Where are you located?

    Do you use ethanol blended gasoline?

    How long have you owned this machine?

    Is it currently running properly with no significant issues?

  5. #5

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    We are using K100 as our fuel additive of choice. It comes highly recommended from local guys around here.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Well, give us some info.

    How long do you intend to have it in storage?

    Where are you located?

    Do you use ethanol blended gasoline?

    How long have you owned this machine?

    Is it currently running properly with no significant issues?
    It will be stored for approximately 6 months

    Washington State - winter temps usually just above freezing with occasional temps below freezing for a few days. It will be stored inside an insulated but not heated garage.

    Use 93 octane fuel with up to 10% ethanol but I have access to 89 octane non ethanol as well.

    Owned for just over a year - bought with 40 hours on it and it now has 95 hours.

    Currently runs fine.

    I have changed the oil, flushed it, cleaned inside hull and will remove plugs to spray defogging oil in cylinders and on plugs (per manual). Then remove battery and place on battery maintainer. My only concern is the fuel still in the tank and whether I can leave it or if I should add a bunch of non ethanol fuel to top it off so moisture doesn't accumulate.

  7. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Ethanol blended gasoline is generally disliked as it is more fragile during storage. The ethanol absorbs moisture readily when exposed to the atmosphere and the effective fuel octane degrades with time.

    Your fuel tank should be mostly sealed from the outside air, but l expect there is a factory pressure/vacuum relief valve that does allows air to vent in/out if the tank’s internal air pressure varies enough.

    Fogging oil seems reasonable and do whatever else is recommended to keep the supercharger and the engine in good health during storage.

    The Owners manual (page 4 says the minimum fuel octane for your engine is 90.

    I will suggest filling the fuel tank from near empty to about 75% full with non-ethanol gasoline (89 octane in your case) and adding a double dose of fuel stabilizer that is ethanol rated. I will suggest using Startron or Sta-Bil Marine, or even both.

    Come springtime, fill it up with 93 octane fuel. The resulting mixture should be close to 90 octane.

    Ride it at moderate power levels next spring until the blended fuel level gets low, refuel with 93 and enjoy the summer.

  8. #8
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    Here's how I do them.
    Have you seen pics of what moisture does to these Kawi pumps.....YIKES! Fill the tank with non ethanol.
    I use Lucas ethanol safegaurd to treat the fuel first.
    I use a 2psi air pump to blow water out of the cooling system AND the intercooler.
    Then I funnel in some pink RV antifreeze, then blow it out again.
    Fire up the machine and rev it a couple times.
    Then I take loose one of the small hoses up front by the supercharger intake hose.....fogging oil ready.
    Fire the machine up again and while idle start spraying in the fogging oil until the engine chugs and sounds like it's going to die.
    This way makes sure EVERYTHING is coated with oil INCLUDING the SC guts AND the backsides of the valves.
    I have been doing EVERY 4 stroke machine that comes through my shop this way for many years. Have never had a customer call in the spring with issues. Just did a '17 and '19 supercharged Seadoos like this yesterday.

  9. #9
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myself View Post

    I use a 2psi air pump to blow water out of the cooling system AND the intercooler.

    Then I funnel in some pink RV antifreeze, then blow it out again.
    2 PSI air?

    Where and how anti-freeze is ‘poured in’ matters, and varies with brand and model.

    I often see comments suggesting anti-freeze but without specifics. Especially when the model involved is self-draining and anti-freeze is not required or recommended by the manufacturer.

    The Kawasaki 2010 Ultra 260 will have a specific water hose and (apparently) self-draining configuration for the cooling system. Pouring anti-freeze using gravity feed into the self-draining cooling system may or may not actually flow antifreeze liquid through the engine water jackets. It may simply flow through some hoses and out the bottom/back somewhere.

    Using anti-freeze on engine configurations that do not benefit from anti-freeze is not necessarily harmful to the engine, but it seems to add unneeded effort, concern and cost to the winterization process. Especially for an owner that does not have the correct propylene glycol product on hand already for use with some other watercraft that DO require anti-freeze treatment.

    Which modern (made in last decade or so) 4-stroke PWC engines actually require anti-freeze during the winter storage preparation process?

    If it is not required and the machine will be just fine come next spring, why mess about with anti-freeze?

  10. #10
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    Actually, ALL of the current Kawasaki 4-strokes require that you remove the bottom hose and let it drain inside the hull. Taking this hose off each year certainly doesn't do it any good, hence I run Marine/RV antifreeze in it. I haven't looked at the 250/260 models, but I would presume that they are similar. If you live in an area subject to freezing temps, run the antifreeze.

    I rig up a 1 gallon jug to the flush port, start the engine, turn the jug upside down and squeeze it. I can empty about half the jug into the engine, then I shut it off, let the jug refill with air, and repeat the process until virtually all the antifreeze has been squeezed out.

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