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  1. #11
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    … ALL of the current Kawasaki 4-strokes require that you remove the bottom hose and let it drain inside the hull….
    Is this documented in the Kawasaki Owner’s manual somewhere?

    Just had a look at the 2021 310R owners manual and it does not mention disconnecting or clearing out any water cooling hoses inside the hull prior to cold weather storage.
    Bilge system hoses yes, but not the engine cooling

    I do not have the Kawasaki service manuals, perhaps they describe different winterization procedures or precautions?

  2. #12
    Myself's Avatar
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    I also use the flush ports. I have a garden hose fitting clamped to a 2ft length of hose. Screws right into a 'Doo and Kawi, and into the adapter on a Yamaha. On the Yamaha I also use a pair of hose pinch pliers to clamp off the exit line at the 'y' so everything goes up through the engine. Here is the pump I use...-->https://www.pricepulse.app/ez-inflat...ato_us_1084016. I funnel some RV antifreeze then blow it on through with the pump, then repeat until I see pink streaming out the bottom of the machine. Most engines have little pockets that WILL hold water even though they are 'self draining'. Not to mention that plain water also corrodes aluminum over time. Since I'm the guy doing the winterization that the customer pays for, I'm not taking ANY chances of having something freeze or corrode.
    Side note....I just did a head gasket job on an Ultra 300. There were several tablespoons of water sitting around in the cylinder water jackets of this 'self draining' engine.

  3. #13

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    Ok, so even if the manual says nothing about adding anti-freeze, it will not harm things if you add a gallon or so using the flush port and then just run the engine for a few seconds to move the anti freeze through the system?

    I am adding a few moisture wicking things into the engine compartment as a precaution to try and get any moisture that accumulates there. Maybe overkill, but these skis sound like they are quite particular and sensitive, so I want to do everything within reason to keep it in great running condition, especially since there do not appear to be any shops around here that service these, I'm having to figure it out on my own and with help from the forum, which has been excellent.

  4. #14
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myself View Post
    I also use the flush ports. I have a garden hose fitting clamped to a 2ft length of hose. Screws right into a 'Doo and Kawi, and into the adapter on a Yamaha.

    On the Yamaha I also use a pair of hose pinch pliers to clamp off the exit line at the 'y' so everything goes up through the engine.

    Here is the pump I use...-->https://www.pricepulse.app/ez-inflat...ato_us_1084016.

    I funnel some RV antifreeze then blow it on through with the pump, then repeat until I see pink streaming out the bottom of the machine.

    Most engines have little pockets that WILL hold water even though they are 'self draining'. Not to mention that plain water also corrodes aluminum over time.

    Since I'm the guy doing the winterization that the customer pays for, I'm not taking ANY chances of having something freeze or corrode.

    Side note....I just did a head gasket job on an Ultra 300. There were several tablespoons of water sitting around in the cylinder water jackets of this 'self draining' engine.
    Fair comments.

    Applying the hose pinch pliers on the main water feed hose is the sort of detail often missing when people say they ‘used anti-freeze’ on a Yamaha.

    On Yamaha do you mean you look for pink anti-freeze to appear on top of the ride plate and then dribble off?
    The main water exit from the engine and the exhaust outlet both dump onto the ride plate.

    The Yamaha engine oil cooler also has an adjacent water exit on the side of the hull under the rub rail.
    On the supercharged Yamaha engines the intercooler has additional water exits on the right side under the rub rail.

    From a freeze damage perspective, small amounts of water sitting inside in larger engine cavities should not create water freeze expansion forces against the metal. Water trapped in an enclosed space without any room for expansion, that is when freeze damage risk is high.

    I have yet to pull apart either of my SVHO engines but in years past when rebuilding 2-stroke motors with raw water cooling I rarely encountered much internal corrosion in the engine water jackets, even after several summers of fresh water riding and several winters of cold storage. Some perhaps, but usually nothing worrisome. No anti-freeze treatment, just self-drain and brief engine revving blips to blow out the exhaust.

    Salt water engines, different story.

  5. #15
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samish260 View Post
    Ok, so even if the manual says nothing about adding anti-freeze, it will not harm things if you add a gallon or so using the flush port and then just run the engine for a few seconds to move the anti freeze through the system?

    I am adding a few moisture wicking things into the engine compartment as a precaution to try and get any moisture that accumulates there.

    Maybe overkill, but these skis sound like they are quite particular and sensitive, so I want to do everything within reason to keep it in great running condition …
    To be clear, the only water pump in the entire machine is the jet pump itself. The engine itself does not have a water pump.

    When adding anti-freeze, or just connected to a garden hose, the reason for running the engine is to prevent water from accumulating inside the ‘wet’ exhaust system. Water is injected into the raw exhaust gasses flow from the running engine to reduce the downstream exhaust temps.

    If water or anti-freeze is flowed into the cooling system with the engine not running, the liquid could potentially accumulate inside the exhaust and back flood into the engine cylinders.

    This is why you are always advised to start the PWC engine before turning on the garden hose (or anti-freeze) flow, and turn off the water flow before stopping the engine. The exhaust flow pushes any accumulated water through the exhaust system and out the exhaust hull fitting. This is why you will see water expelled out the exhaust port when you blip the throttle.

    Running the engine does not ‘move’ the water or anti-freeze through the engine cooling system. The only thing moving the liquid is the pressure flowing from the garden hose itself.

    Drier absorbent packs seems like a fine thing to do, just be sure to first vacuum or stop up all liquid water from the bilge spaces under the engine and elsewhere down low. Air/sun dry the front storage and engine compartments.

  6. #16
    Myself's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Fair comments.



    On Yamaha do you mean you look for pink anti-freeze to appear on top of the ride plate and then dribble off?
    The main water exit from the engine and the exhaust outlet both dump onto the ride plate.
    Sorry, yes. Basically just step back and watch for pink instead of clear in the general area under the pump. A bit will spit out of the exhaust, a bit will spit out of the pissers, and of course from the natural exit up in the pump cavity and onto the ride plate.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Is this documented in the Kawasaki Owner’s manual somewhere?
    Yes. I'm traveling this week. I'll find it in the owner's manual when I get home.

  8. #18
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    I do not see it in the Ultra 310 Owner's Manual, nor the Service Manual.

    However, it does appear in the Ultra LX Service Manual, and as an addendum to the STX-15F Owner's Manual.

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