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  1. #21

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    My oil tonight not to clean all my contacts and get this battery drain figured out

  2. #22

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    This flushed it good now I bought the factory oil and filter going in it before I run it on the lake tomorrow or Saturday

  3. #23
    disconnect every electrical connector and blow any remaining water out with compressed air, then apply dielectric grease and reassemble. Water can remain in those connectors for a LONG time

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4tec Hoarder View Post
    disconnect every electrical connector and blow any remaining water out with compressed air, then apply dielectric grease and reassemble. Water can remain in those connectors for a LONG time
    If there is ANY water in ANY connector, I would assume it's salty. So what hoarder said is super important. We use salt fog, where I work, to test corrosion resistance. Salt water is HORRIBLE.

  5. #25
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4tec Hoarder View Post
    disconnect every electrical connector and blow any remaining water out with compressed air, then apply dielectric grease and reassemble.

    Water can remain in those connectors for a LONG time
    I would add a couple of steps.

    Let the connector air dry (sunshine or perhaps mild electric heat gun) or perhaps use a spray product that drives water out. WD-40 does this but it leaves a film that takes a long time to evaporate. I do not like using WD-40 inside electrical connectors, especially connectors with flexible gasket seals.

    I would apply an electrical contact cleaner such as Caig DeoxIT. The idea is to drive out any moisture hidden in the cracks and crevices of the connector and also clean the metal pin/socket contact surfaces. Contact cleaner should be compatible with the plastics and seals and not leave any undesirable film at all.

    Before reassembly you need 100% of the moisture gone and the connector perfectly functional. The DeoxIT spray products have a solvent ‘carrier’ which delivers the actual contact cleaning/enhancing chemicals.

    After you have the connectors 100% functional you may apply an additional product to keep it functional and well sealed.




    There are contact enhancing products that improve the electrical connection between pin and socket. Dielectric grease is not that.

    Dielectric grease is an electrical insulator, not a conductor. The primary purpose of dielectric grease is to coat the outside surfaces of the contacts, displacing air and moisture, hopefully preventing the contact metal from being corroded.

    Apply dielectric grease to a connector after it is fully clean and dry, and tested/working 100%. Do not use dielectric grease as a fix or ‘improver’ for electrical connections.

    Dielectric grease is often used to lubricate the soft perimeter seal of a waterproof electrical connector. The idea is to allow the seal to slide into place without binding or being damaged by friction. Since dielectric grease is non-conductive there is no electrical leakage path between the inside and the outside, around the seal. And no electrical leakage path between adjacent pins, should the grease bridge the gap.

    Do not pack the inside of the connector with dielectric grease or push it into the individual sockets or pins. Not only does the grease not improve the connection, the excess grease can create unwanted hydraulic pressure when the connector is assembled.


  6. #26
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    For those that want to dive deeper into dielectric grease use and common misunderstandings, this article should be of interest.

    … In regular low voltage multiple-pin circuit connectors, such as automotive applications, flooding with a proper insulating grease of low-viscosity dielectric grease is perfectly acceptable unless a manufacturer recommends against it.

    The grease should have good stability and not contain metals in any form, and be specifically designed for use as a dielectric grease. This generally is a silicone dielectric grease, although some Teflon based greases are acceptable.
    https://www.w8ji.com/dielectric_grea...ive_grease.htm


    Related note: Anti-seize compounds often contain powdered metals, such as ‘copper anti-seize’. Anti-seize products can be similar to dielectric greases but the addition of metallic compounds means that they are absolutely NOT to be applied to any electrical connection anywhere in a watercraft.

    For the electrical system anti-seize compound should be considered a contaminant. Even a fingerprint of anti-seize can mess with electrical connections.

    When applying anti-seize compound to spark plug threads it is critical that none of it get onto the white spark plug insulator material. The ceramic white insulator material must be perfectly clean after the spark plugs are installed. A very thin film of dielectric grease can be applied to the inside walls of the spark plug boots, to lubricate the boot and help seal out moisture.

    Only a very small amount/film of anti-seize compound should be applied to spark plug threads. Whether it is needed or not is outside the scope of this dielectric discussion.


  7. #27

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    Yes sir I got electric cleaner and compressed air die electric greasing afterwards there are a lot.

  8. #28

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    Dude thank you so much for this I really appreciate it

  9. #29

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    I can't get the bolt put of my oil filter??? I have a E10 socket on a small 1/4 inch drive seem to be on it well and really good grip. How tight do they put these on? Are there any specific Sea Doo tools that make this easier???

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by j-wadd View Post
    I can't get the bolt put of my oil filter??? I have a E10 socket on a small 1/4 inch drive seem to be on it well and really good grip. How tight do they put these on? Are there any specific Sea Doo tools that make this easier???
    Mine was pretty tight. I was actually a little scared the first time I took it off.

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