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  1. #11
    raiderx72's Avatar
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    Use some epoxy resin and go over it.

  2. #12
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimeBandit View Post
    ... the risk of water wicking into and destroying the composite laminate is not applicable with nano SMC or ...

    Given that this appears to be a paint rub (and primer) ... this really is not as bad as it looks...

    ... hit it when some rattle can paint from time to time.
    The light grey area is the actual NanoXcel fibrous structural material exposed. The blacker donut is the hard outer hull coating (maybe 1mm thick) and then of course the paint layer.



    Do you have a reference for the stance that over time water will not seep into the fibrous core of the NanoXcel 2 material?

    I agree that the damage is not deep enough to weaken the hull strength, but I will suggest that a protective layer of epoxy resin properly bonded* to the NanoXcel material would provide a better repair than simply applying spray paint.

    Sand the hardened epoxy patch to paintable smooth, then paint. We used automotive grade color matched paint.


    * Meaning that the exposed area first needs to be sanded, then cleaned and de-waxed (we used acetone on a fresh cloth, turning the cloth to a fresh surface frequently).

  3. #13
    TimeBandit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    The light grey area is the actual NanoXcel fibrous structural material exposed. The blacker donut is the hard outer hull coating (maybe 1mm thick) and then of course the paint layer.

    Do you have a reference for the stance that over time water will not seep into the fibrous core of the NanoXcel 2 material?
    I could be mistaken, but the black doughnut, as you say, seems more to me like a type of primer, more a “sealer”. This is common when ordinary paint, say automotive single-stage paint will come into contact with a plastic. Typically, the sealer solves two issues, adhesion and a chemical barrier – to keep the SMC chemicals and paint chemical from crossing into each other – not to seal out water, yet that will occur as well. I see this a lot in the automotive industry when plastic parts are painted with the car’s same outer body paint.

    On the SMC moisture question, I’m sure that data is attainable, but all one needs to understand moisture properties of polyesters -vs- epoxies. SMC can come in many many matrix blends including those two base-resins. Yamaha seems to be a bit vague on their exact formulation (no surprise), yet what we do know, is that Yamaha SMC esters are epoxy-based – at least in that family. It’s why Total-boat epoxies make for a more reliable repair - compatibility.

    So, it is well-known in the industry that polyesters are economical and strong, hence widely used, but have very poor resistance to water absorption. What occurs in traditional fiber-glass boats, is that the polyester will separate along each and every exposed glass fiber, and like a super-highway network due to the fibers being either cloth or thatch-sheets, travel deep into the laminated layers, and … structural failure. In contrast, the exact same lay-up technique and glass cloths of laminate with epoxy resin would not exhibit this characteristic - or let’s just say you’d be talking a incredibly long and hot exposure to water to even make a dent.
    Now consider NanoXcel having also the nano-wax filler - even more natural water resistance. SMC fibers are random, short, often in suspension in the matrix, thus do not “network” as easily (aka touch like traditional glass cloths do), so even if epoxies were just as weak, the moister would not be able to travel as easy.

    Scientifically … sure, exposed Yamaha SMC can indeed absorb some level of moisture over a very very long time, and temperature-variable. But we don’t often live or operate in a lab, so I’m not going to give a lab-opinion. The question was asked, “should I be concerned ??” My opinion, based on experience and the understanding of epoxies, Yamaha SMC historical resilience, the limited recreational exposure his craft will ever have over the prospective length of total owner ship, together with personal care (aka he’s not the type to continue beaching it), expense of repair, benefit of said repair … brings me to the very easy conclusion of “no real concern, other than cosmetic”. I think for many, a said repair is more a cognitive than physical, as this will often result in giving the owner an added piece of mind – which is indeed a worth-while value in it’s own regard. Repair shops most certainly understand this.

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  5. #14
    Do nothing. The price what shops charge to make these "repairs" is nothing short of insanity at times. Timebandit is dead on. Its cosmetic. Enjoy your sled, for all anyone knows you will run over a log, debris and create another area. That being said I wouldn't intentionally beach it, or let it slam up against the dock. When you go to sale do a cost vs return analysis to clean it up for next buyer.

  6. #15
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Excellent reply.

    Given how soft the NanXcel 2 fibrous core material is I will still suggest at least a skim coating of epoxy over the worn area to reduce potential water flow erosion of the hull material over time. This can be done without a shop or professional service. The linked document shows how.

    Good to know that water absorption is not itself a source of degradation with NanoXcel.

  7. #16
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    If you decide you want to do some painting, these guys might be a good place to start for diy. Agree, shop rates on repair and paint for the skis can be very expensive.

    https://www.colorrite.com/index.cfm


  8. #17
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YamahaSHO View Post
    Before my first Yamaha hull repair I purchased paint kits from from ColorRite (the Yamaha 'official' repair paint source). We have one red and one blue GP1800. I ordered color correct base coat for each, clear coat, plus primer. Also the touch up bottles for each hull. All from colorrite, using the Yamaha paint codes.

    The product is unimpressive. The colorrite spray paint goes on quite thin and takes a bunch of color coats to provide full coverage. Two coats is merely the start. Just not great paint.

    For my last hull repair we had a local auto parts supplier do a color match and mix a custom can of red. Went on much better, just all around better paint. The color match is so good I have trouble telling where the fresh paint overlaps the original.

    I would not buy ColorRite paint again.


  9. #18
    raiderx72's Avatar
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    Just use expoxy resin and call it a day

  10. #19
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    Ah crap, I have a box of colorite in my shop right now, Unopened. Like k447, I grabbed the full set. Looks like I set myself myself up for disappointment. Thanks for the heads-up and excuse the misdirection. My last hull (sho) was black, made it easy to forget about it. Now it's a bright red and it doesn't take much to rub it off.

  11. #20
    Just for a data point. I had numerous boats with Alpha 1 outdrives. During a water pump replacement the front of the drive was deformed where the upper and lower halfs bolt together. I used silicone just to make area look better. didnt need it as that whole area is submerged in water. Long story short that silicone stayed there for 10 years!! talk about erosion, and extreme service. If someone had to put something over the damaged area if silicone will stick it will stay, even the silicone smeared on the flat outside of drive never ever came off. funny thing if I took my fingernail i could scrape it off. oh crap boundary layer affect. the water next to your haul is almost stationary at speed. don't believe me stick your had on the roof of your car when driving down the freeway the air is stationary. Fluid mechanics.

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