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  1. #1

    Differences/advantages/disadvantages of TR-1 versus 1800?

    Curious to know what thoughts are on the TR-1 HO engine versus the 1800 HO? I've been looking at some of the VX models, and they have the TR-1 triple, where the GP and FX models still have the 1800. Specifically, I've been looking at the GP1800R-HO, but I'd also been looking at a couple of the VX models as well that had the TR-1 HO in them and didn't know if that was a good choice or not.

    I have owned a Waverunner or two before with the 1800 HO NA engine, and those were pretty bulletproof - never had any issues. I've never run the TR-1 before though, so I'm unsure if that would be as good or reliable as the 1800.

  2. #2
    The 1.8 HO is super reliable. I drove a 19' VX with the TR-1, noticed it was a tad more noisy than the 1.8L - Throttle response was a bit more lazy for sure than my Cruiser HO. VX models with the TR-1 have a slimmer middle/captain seat. It's not as wide as the Cruiser HO.

    Enjoyable ride though, very manageable throttle response. 53mph top end 400ft above sea level 89 degrees F.

    I felt like the Cruiser HO had more stability/weight in the water. Just my opinion of course!

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by LivingSlow View Post
    The 1.8 HO is super reliable. I drove a 19' VX with the TR-1, noticed it was a tad more noisy than the 1.8L - Throttle response was a bit more lazy for sure than my Cruiser HO. VX models with the TR-1 have a slimmer middle/captain seat. It's not as wide as the Cruiser HO.

    Enjoyable ride though, very manageable throttle response. 53mph top end 400ft above sea level 89 degrees F.

    I felt like the Cruiser HO had more stability/weight in the water. Just my opinion of course!
    Thanks for the input on this - I just don't know a whole lot about the TR-1, and I want to be sure to look before I leap. Given the choice, I'd stick with the 1800 without some more info about the long-term reliability of the TR-1 though.

    I'd seen some of the reviews on the GP1800R that indicated the same regarding the stability (though I think it's probably still solid out on the water regardless). I've owned a VX prior to this (with the 1800) and was really happy with it, we just ended up trading it for a boat, and now we're looking to get another PWC. We're experienced riders, so I don't think the GP will be a disappointment to us, but to me it's a question about how usable it will be for all day use out on the water. It may be a good platform for racing and tearing it up on the slalom course, but it may suck for casual riding and going to and from the course across the open water - these are the questions I need to ask before I just jump on buying a GP. That and the question about the motors of course.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenk2 View Post
    Curious to know what thoughts are on the TR-1 HO engine versus the 1800 HO? I've been looking at some of the VX models, and they have the TR-1 triple, where the GP and FX models still have the 1800. Specifically, I've been looking at the GP1800R-HO, but I'd also been looking at a couple of the VX models as well that had the TR-1 HO in them and didn't know if that was a good choice or not.

    I have owned a Waverunner or two before with the 1800 HO NA engine, and those were pretty bulletproof - never had any issues. I've never run the TR-1 before though, so I'm unsure if that would be as good or reliable as the 1800.
    Reliability wise. They are both excellent if properly maintained,, my only concern is that you have already owned an ski with the 1.8 motor,, after riding a 1.8 ho ski ,you will get bored rather quickly with the tr1,or tr1 ho(there is absolutely nothing " high output " about it) iam not referring to just top speed. The tr1 will feel anemic in torque/acceleration compared to the 1.8. Iam not knocking the tr1 powered vx. Its a great ski , and will satisfy most, but if you were satisfied with the performance of the 1.8 ho powered ski, you will be immediately disappointed with the tr1 ho on the first pull of the throttle, good luck with your decision

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Yamafzs View Post
    Reliability wise. They are both excellent if properly maintained,, my only concern is that you have already owned an ski with the 1.8 motor,, after riding a 1.8 ho ski ,you will get bored rather quickly with the tr1,or tr1 ho(there is absolutely nothing " high output " about it) iam not referring to just top speed. The tr1 will feel anemic in torque/acceleration compared to the 1.8. Iam not knocking the tr1 powered vx. Its a great ski , and will satisfy most, but if you were satisfied with the performance of the 1.8 ho powered ski, you will be immediately disappointed with the tr1 ho on the first pull of the throttle, good luck with your decision
    This!

    I owned a gp and a vx that had the TR1 in it. The Vx was the "Cadillac" and my choice to ride after about an hour on the GP. The SVHO is an adrenalin rush and a blast to ride but wears you out if you ride it hard for very long. The VX on the other hand is a dog out of the hole compared to the bigger engine but serves it's purpose. Probably half the 140 hours I had on it were pulling a larger sized 2 person tube and it did it with no problem. Basically you're deciding between a v6 cadillac or a high powered sports car.

  6. #6
    Thanks - I'm leaning more towards the 1800 at this point, since I've had experience with it and the reliability.

    Slightly off-topic, but what would be the best choice for all-day riding, the GP, VX or FX? My concern is that the GP would be a blast to ride for short periods, but wouldn't be as fun for all-day riding out on the water. Also, are there huge differences between the VX and FX in terms of usage and rideability? I owned an FX with the 1800 previously, and it was a great all-around ski, but back at that time, the VX line was definitely the value proposition and not as fully-featured as they are nowadays. Are there deeper differences between the VX and FX lines that would still make the FX a better choice even with the greater cost?

  7. #7
    Where will you be riding mostly? ponds and lakes or ocean?


  8. #8
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenk2 View Post
    ... the reliability.

    .... best choice for all-day riding, the GP, VX or FX?

    My concern is that the GP would be a blast to ride for short periods, but wouldn't be as fun for all-day riding out on the water.

    Also, are there huge differences between the VX and FX in terms of usage and rideability?

    I owned an FX with the 1800 previously, and it was a great all-around ski, but back at that time, the VX line was definitely the value proposition and not as fully-featured as they are nowadays.

    Are there deeper differences between the VX and FX lines that would still make the FX a better choice even with the greater cost?
    Yamaha does not make an ‘unreliable’ model. In stock form all the engines and models are reliable. The 1.8 engine has the longest history and is very well regarded.

    Modified, the Yamaha SVHO engine has the largest performance increase potential. My two GP1800 SVHO are close to 300 hours each, with no issues. One supercharger clutch replaced so far.

    Yamaha recently rejigged their model naming. GP1800R is now a hull designation. GP1800R SVHO has the supercharged 1.8 liter engine while GP1800R HO has the non-supercharged 1.8 engine. All GP1800 use NanoXcel 2 hull material which is lighter than the original NanoXcel.

    2021 GP1800R have a new upper deck and hull liner, different dash. Fuel tank relocated lower and less forward, for improved handling.

    VX series has the TR-1 engine. VX HO variations use the 1.8 non-supercharged engine.

    The 2015 VX hull redesign was a major change. Larger hull, much better ride in non-smooth water, overall quite an upgrade. NanoXcel hull material. The new-for-2017 GP1800 SVHO hull was derived from the new-for-2015 VX hull.

    The FX has always been the largest Yamaha hull, considered the most forgiving ride in rough water.

    New FX hull design in 2020, derived from GP1800 hull. Some complaints about frequent bow spray and ‘wet ride’. Aftermarket intake grate required if modified for speeds above about 72mph.


    We often ride long distances on our two 2017 GP1800 SVHO. 4-6 hours on plane is not unusual. Aftermarket extended ride plate and intake grate, configured more for rough water handling and consistent hull tracking rather than top speed.

    We tend to ride standing up, with flexed legs. Rarely carry passengers. If I was going to be sitting down while riding distance or carrying a passenger, and especially in rough water, I would be looking to the FX.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by gsxr1300 View Post
    Where will you be riding mostly? ponds and lakes or ocean?
    Lakes and rivers - we visit Lake Havasu and Lake Powell in the summer, and we have lakes and rivers up here where we live locally as well. Havasu and Powell are large enough where rough water conditions are definitely a concern; not quite as bad in our local waterways (though those can be rough at times too).

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Yamaha does not make an ‘unreliable’ model. In stock form all the engines and models are reliable. The 1.8 engine has the longest history and is very well regarded.

    Modified, the Yamaha SVHO engine has the largest performance increase potential. My two GP1800 SVHO are close to 300 hours each, with no issues. One supercharger clutch replaced so far.

    Yamaha recently rejigged their model naming. GP1800R is now a hull designation. GP1800R SVHO has the supercharged 1.8 liter engine while GP1800R HO has the non-supercharged 1.8 engine. All GP1800 use NanoXcel 2 hull material which is lighter than the original NanoXcel.

    2021 GP1800R have a new upper deck and hull liner, different dash. Fuel tank relocated lower and less forward, for improved handling.

    VX series has the TR-1 engine. VX HO variations use the 1.8 non-supercharged engine.

    The 2015 VX hull redesign was a major change. Larger hull, much better ride in non-smooth water, overall quite an upgrade. NanoXcel hull material. The new-for-2017 GP1800 SVHO hull was derived from the new-for-2015 VX hull.

    The FX has always been the largest Yamaha hull, considered the most forgiving ride in rough water.

    New FX hull design in 2020, derived from GP1800 hull. Some complaints about frequent bow spray and ‘wet ride’. Aftermarket intake grate required if modified for speeds above about 72mph.


    We often ride long distances on our two 2017 GP1800 SVHO. 4-6 hours on plane is not unusual. Aftermarket extended ride plate and intake grate, configured more for rough water handling and consistent hull tracking rather than top speed.

    We tend to ride standing up, with flexed legs. Rarely carry passengers. If I was going to be sitting down while riding distance or carrying a passenger, and especially in rough water, I would be looking to the FX.
    Thanks - this is very helpful!

    We had a supercharged ski at one point, and I'll likely not own one again, mostly due to the fuel consumption/range issues. We just had too much fun tearing it up out on the water with it and burned through multiple tanks of gas per day (which got to be an issue in areas without fuel availability on the water). Which leaves the HO models.......

    I would say that 75% of the time, it'll just be single-rider, but both my son & daughter have significant others now, so I anticipate that there will be more 2-up riding this season. Myself, my son & daughter have quite a bit of experience riding, but their significant others do not, so it sounds like the VX or FX might be a better idea for us right now. The FX we had was quite good back when we owned that - I suspect we may go that way again this time. My thought was that Yamaha had changed things up enough recently with the VX and FX lineup that the VX would be a closer competitor at this point. When the VX's first came out, they were more of an entry-level model, and I think we would have been disappointed, but with the HO models, it sounds like they may be worth more of a look.

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