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  1. #11

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    When pumping grease into the intermediate bearing, are there any signs that the housing is full or that the seal has been blown? thanks michael

  2. #12
    This is how I run a jetski shop in the desert nmpeter's Avatar
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    I pay very careful attention to the hose leading to the bearing from the zerk fitting

    if the ski in question doesn't look like its seen the inside of a shop for ten years. I'll give it grease until the hose swells up an almost imperceptible amount

    If you have a good feel for your greasegun, you can sometimes tell by the amount of hand pressure needed to inject the grease

    if its anew to you ski its a fine idea to pull the pump and back shaft to see if there is any rust on the splines, indicative of lack of service. Clean it up with a brass brush grease it with good stuff, reassemble then give it a shot or two of the good stuff and call it a day

    if you pull tubes or waterskiiers, highly advised to do it yearly

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  4. #13

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    Thanks for the information. Filling that intermediate bearing with grease takes a bit of touch. Now to find that grease fitting near the bendix. michael

  5. #14
    It's a little bit annoying for sure. I know the first time I did it on my XL800, the hose popped off the fitting. Didn't realize it and I kept pumping.

  6. #15
    steve45's Avatar
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    Many of these things have NEVER been greased since new. On those, the grease has probably hardened inside the hose. Best thing to do if you're not sure if it's been serviced is to remove the hose from the bearing housing and pump a bunch of fresh grease through it, then replace the hose and give it a shot or two.


  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    Many of these things have NEVER been greased since new. On those, the grease has probably hardened inside the hose. Best thing to do if you're not sure if it's been serviced is to remove the hose from the bearing housing and pump a bunch of fresh grease through it, then replace the hose and give it a shot or two.
    I feel like Iím learning all over again. After a long hiatus I had no idea of all the additional maintenance required. Especially on 2strokes. ThAnkful for these forums and thankful for YouTube

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  9. #17
    butterbean_29512's Avatar
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    From what Yamaha says the intermediate bearing is a sealed unit, and the hose and grease fitting is there to lubricate the seal lips only. That's why they state only one or 2 pumps once a year. It will blow the seal out of the rear of the housing, and the next time it gets wet in that area it ruins the bearing.


  10. #18
    TimeBandit's Avatar
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    If that is relatively the same IB housing design that's in most of the modern-day 4-strokes (and it looks to be - according to the fiche P/N revisions) … the void/cavity for the zerk/hose grease does indeed share space with the open bearing that's in the middle, having separate seals on either end - specifically forward of the bearing is one shaft seal, and aft are two shaft seals - held in-place by fore & aft huge cir-clips. Of these 3 seals, if you look at the service manual (or have the unit fully disassembled on the bench), you'll note the seal's lips are directional and back-sprung supported, which permits excess grease to easily seep past - yet resist the opposite direction. Think like a one-way "check valve" of sorts, where the fwd seal allows grease out fwd, and the two aft can allow grease out aft - yet not allow water in. In other words, while it is good advice to pump slowly, I see little-to-no risk of literal seal damage or displacement occurring - being that the seal are not already dry-rot, burnt, or otherwise.
    Best practice is to pump in grease until you feel an sudden increase in resistance, which means the housing voids are all full of grease. Then slowly add another 2-4 pumps to "flush" excess trapped air/water, and even some old grease past the seals.

    Special note on splines: Yamaha has made a variety of designs to this similar unit over the years, so a very limited run / model having a pin-hole port to also feed grease to the splines. For the most-part, this is rare, so the vast majority of IB units do not have the spline port-hole. This means, once again referencing the service manual, that the splines must be lubed manually and independently of the IB housing zerk/hose, often with different types of grease.

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