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  1. #11
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    A possible option, which would certainly be a project, is something a bunch of PWC fishing guys have done.

    The older Yamaha SUV watercraft model is quite large, about five feet wide and has a LOT of room on board for storage and stuff. More stable while floating than the 3 person PWC. The SUV model was discontinued years ago. It is rated to carry four people.

    The catch is that the SUV only came from the factory with a modest power 2-stroke motor. Nowhere near the power of the bigger 4-stroke engines and less reliable long term.

    It is possible to fit a modern 4-stroke Yamaha engine into the SUV hull, doing what is known as an engine conversion. A lot of the 4-stroke Yamaha parts and the engine actually bolt right in. That said, some fabrication work is still necessary. There have been a few guys on here that have posted how-to threads with info and photos. And a few guys even offered these SUV conversions as a service.

    Something to keep in mind if you find that using a PWC is going to work for you, but you really want a larger PWC than the Yamaha FX

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    A possible option, which would certainly be a project, is something a bunch of PWC fishing guys have done.

    The older Yamaha SUV watercraft model is quite large, about five feet wide and has a LOT of room on board for storage and stuff. More stable while floating than the 3 person PWC. The SUV model was discontinued years ago. It is rated to carry four people.

    The catch is that the SUV only came from the factory with a modest power 2-stroke motor. Nowhere near the power of the bigger 4-stroke engines and less reliable long term.

    It is possible to fit a modern 4-stroke Yamaha engine into the SUV hull, doing what is known as an engine conversion. A lot of the 4-stroke Yamaha parts and the engine actually bolt right in. That said, some fabrication work is still necessary. There have been a few guys on here that have posted how-to threads with info and photos. And a few guys even offered these SUV conversions as a service.

    Something to keep in mind if you find that using a PWC is going to work for you, but you really want a larger PWC than the Yamaha FX

    Thanks K447. I had no idea a large Yamaha PWC existed like that. That's definitely not something I want to get into since it's more of a project and not something currently being sold.
    Are you able to view inside the impeller housing from inside the water if you had goggles, or is this dangerous to do?
    Could you adjust the trim to help with wet rides? This may not be a big issue for me since my expectation is to get wet. I just need something that will get me to the grounds and back safely, more than what my kayaks can do for me in the more remote areas.

  3. #13
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by musubi View Post
    ...
    Are you able to view inside the impeller housing from inside the water if you had goggles, or is this dangerous to do?

    Could you adjust the trim to help with wet rides? ...
    With the hull floating upright, you would need a strong light to see up into the pump tunnel, and look beyond the intake grate. And also manipulate hand tool(s) to extract the debris item(s) from the impeller, which is over a foot beyond the intake grate. And do all of this while the hull is bobbing and moving on the water and you are swimming under the hull.

    I often remove weed clogs from the intake grate with the hull floating upright and me in the water. I can reach the grate while my head is above water beside the gunwale.

    For actual debris stuck in the impeller, I have always rotated the hull so the intake grate was above water. Perhaps I get the hull onto a beach or shallow water and turn it on its side.

    If I must, then I will invert the hull while floating. This is the hardest method with many things working against you. I consider this a last resort. If I can be towed or find some other solution, I will prefer to not invert the hull.

    If I have the option I just take it back to the trailer so I can get at the jet pump easily and have time and other resources more readily available.

    Sometimes the jet pump has to be removed entirely to extract whatever debris is jammed into the pump.

    Trim up can ‘help’ with a wet riding hull, BUT in rough water trim up can make the hull bounce out of the water more easily. So you cannot go as fast (or maybe not very fast at all) as with trim neutral.

    I often ride at speed in medium rough water with full down trim. That pushes the bow into the waves and helps keep the jet pump hooked up. And sometimes I may spear an unexpectedly large/steep wave and lots of water comes over the bow.

    Also, when carrying a passenger I often trim down to compensate for the passenger weight on the rear.

    Trim is a useful thing and I often use it, but you will need to do some tests riding to determine whether you can use the trim to manage the bow splashing or you need to use the trim to manage the ride attitude.

    Note that the fuel tank is near the front of the hull. A full fuel load is well over 100 pounds. When riding with a full or nearly full fuel tank most hulls handle rough water better (the fuel tank weight helps pushes the bow into the waves). As fuel gets consumed and the hull weight balance shifts rearward you may want some down trim to maintain the hull attitude and sea keeping consistency.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    With the hull floating upright, you would need a strong light to see up into the pump tunnel, and look beyond the intake grate. And also manipulate hand tool(s) to extract the debris item(s) from the impeller, which is over a foot beyond the intake grate. And do all of this while the hull is bobbing and moving on the water and you are swimming under the hull.

    I often remove weed clogs from the intake grate with the hull floating upright and me in the water. I can reach the grate while my head is above water beside the gunwale.

    For actual debris stuck in the impeller, I have always rotated the hull so the intake grate was above water. Perhaps I get the hull onto a beach or shallow water and turn it on its side.

    If I must, then I will invert the hull while floating. This is the hardest method with many things working against you. I consider this a last resort. If I can be towed or find some other solution, I will prefer to not invert the hull.

    If I have the option I just take it back to the trailer so I can get at the jet pump easily and have time and other resources more readily available.

    Sometimes the jet pump has to be removed entirely to extract whatever debris is jammed into the pump.

    Trim up can ‘help’ with a wet riding hull, BUT in rough water trim up can make the hull bounce out of the water more easily. So you cannot go as fast (or maybe not very fast at all) as with trim neutral.

    I often ride at speed in medium rough water with full down trim. That pushes the bow into the waves and helps keep the jet pump hooked up. And sometimes I may spear an unexpectedly large/steep wave and lots of water comes over the bow.

    Also, when carrying a passenger I often trim down to compensate for the passenger weight on the rear.

    Trim is a useful thing and I often use it, but you will need to do some tests riding to determine whether you can use the trim to manage the bow splashing or you need to use the trim to manage the ride attitude.

    Note that the fuel tank is near the front of the hull. A full fuel load is well over 100 pounds. When riding with a full or nearly full fuel tank most hulls handle rough water better (the fuel tank weight helps pushes the bow into the waves). As fuel gets consumed and the hull weight balance shifts rearward you may want some down trim to maintain the hull attitude and sea keeping consistency.

    Thanks for explaining your thoughts on the tunnel and impeller cleaning. That makes sense and I can see inverting the hull being the last resort. We don't have much weeds to get sucked up, but in having a PWC for my uses, I will be using an anchor and I've heard of the anchor line being sucked up there and incapacitating the ski.

    To manage the splash up, I've seen a thread on fixing this, but for a GP1800 (posted by virageracer), which I'll assume is still drier riding than the newer FX hulls. What are your thoughts on having a splash guard and do you think it would help with the splash up into the rider?
    From my readings I see Hydro-Turf and Jettrim makes splash guards, but the foam tears on the Hydro-Turf. https://rivaracing.com/i-17283707-je...ash-guard.html

  5. #15
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by musubi View Post
    ... I will be using an anchor and I've heard of the anchor line being sucked up there and incapacitating the ski.

    To manage the splash up, I've seen a thread on fixing this, but for a GP1800 (posted by virageracer), which I'll assume is still drier riding than the newer FX hulls. What are your thoughts on having a splash guard ...
    I have not ridden the new FX so I cannot comment on how the bow splash occurs (spray pattern) nor how well a splash guard might work on the new FX hull.

    Regarding anchor ropes, if you never start the engine while the anchor rope is out of the storage compartment then it should never be at risk of entering the jet pump. Think about where on the hull you would be attaching the anchor rope. The bow eye is impossible to reach without getting into the water.

    Some riders attach the anchor rope to the bow eye and then route all of the loose rope into front storage, so basically the rope is always attached. Or attach a short (too short to reach the intake grate) rope (or flat webbing strap) to the front eye, and then use a snap hook to connect the main anchor rope.

    Anchoring can be tricky with PWC since rope ingestion is a real concern. Especially in water that is too deep to stand in.

    In calm water I sometimes connect the anchor rope to the rear hoop, but that exposes the hull rear to waves washing into the footwells.

    I have no idea what the sea bottom is where you will be going, but I have had good results using the Cooper Anchor. It is compact and light weight for carrying inside the PWC and seems effective in multiple bottom conditions. Attach several meters of stainless steel chain directly to the anchor before the rope rode.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    I have not ridden the new FX so I cannot comment on how the bow splash occurs (spray pattern) nor how well a splash guard might work on the new FX hull.

    Regarding anchor ropes, if you never start the engine while the anchor rope is out of the storage compartment then it should never be at risk of entering the jet pump. Think about where on the hull you would be attaching the anchor rope. The bow eye is impossible to reach without getting into the water.

    Some riders attach the anchor rope to the bow eye and then route all of the loose rope into front storage, so basically the rope is always attached. Or attach a short (too short to reach the intake grate) rope (or flat webbing strap) to the front eye, and then use a snap hook to connect the main anchor rope.

    Anchoring can be tricky with PWC since rope ingestion is a real concern. Especially in water that is too deep to stand in.

    In calm water I sometimes connect the anchor rope to the rear hoop, but that exposes the hull rear to waves washing into the footwells.

    I have no idea what the sea bottom is where you will be going, but I have had good results using the Cooper Anchor. It is compact and light weight for carrying inside the PWC and seems effective in multiple bottom conditions. Attach several meters of stainless steel chain directly to the anchor before the rope rode.

    Thanks for the recommendation on the anchor. I would be anchoring in reef mostly and for the most part, I would be able to dive down to set it and unhook it. I'm not sure how or where I'd plan on securing the anchor to. The purpose of the PWC is for diving, so getting in the water isn't a big deal for me. However, I'd likely end up using it for fishing at some point, and if anchoring, I'm going to need to find a good way to access it without jumping in.

    Shucks, I was hoping you might have some feedback on the splash guard, but I can try asking the company if it mitigates the splashing on the new FX's.

  7. #17
    I did end up contacting Riva and asked specifically about the FX hull design and if the splash guard would help at all. Mike Hodges responded with the following:

    "An aftermarket splash guard will offer a little more protection from water that is splashed forward, but it's mostly water that's pushed out to the sides that is the issue. A good pair of riding goggles is the best option and quite popular with our customers that ride in rough conditions like the Atlantic ocean. Personally I never ride without eye protection!"

    Picking up riding goggles is probably better than wearing my dive mask with a snorkel, haha. I suppose I could probably create a lip that extended out the front at the bow, but I can see something like that being more of an issue in other ways and probably breaking.

    Anyway, just wanted to update this thread since I did not see much info or feedback on people using splash guards. It's probably still worth getting, although I'm not sure if adding something like that affects handling of the PWC in any way.

  8. #18
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by musubi View Post
    I did end up contacting Riva and asked specifically about the FX hull design and if the splash guard would help at all. Mike Hodges responded with the following:

    "An aftermarket splash guard will offer a little more protection from water that is splashed forward, but it's mostly water that's pushed out to the sides that is the issue.

    A good pair of riding goggles
    is the best option and quite popular with our customers that ride in rough conditions like the Atlantic ocean. Personally I never ride without eye protection
    !"

    Picking up riding goggles is probably better than wearing my dive mask with a snorkel, haha. ...

    ... I did not see much info or feedback on people using splash guards. It's probably still worth getting, although I'm not sure if adding something like that affects handling of the PWC in any way.
    Splash guards tend to not affect the hull handling or ride much at all since the entire guard is well above the water when the hull is on plane.

    Regarding riding glasses/goggles, we have been using Sea Specs for years. They have a never ending ‘special’ of three pairs for the price of two. My own SeaSpecs have prescription lenses.

    I also recommend polarized lens in whatever riding glasses you choose. Polarization really reduces the sunlight glare from the water surface.

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  10. #19
    You shouldn't have any concerns about the reliability of an FX. I fish offshore on a 2012 FXSHO and frequently go 20-30 miles offshore on my own without hesitation regarding the reliability of the ski or restarting the ski after drifting or anchoring for a few hours.

    I would just recommend taking safety precautions. I keep all of the following on my ski--but have never had to use any of these in an emergency, so perhaps it is overkill.

    An EPIRB, handheld marine radio, backup handheld marine radio, a second battery wired on an ACR to be combined for extra starting power if necessary (both Deka AGM), an extra 1100 GPH bilge pump installed that I can manually switch (along with the stock automatic 500 GHP bilge pump), garmin GPS/fishfinder, cellphone with garmin app as a backup gps, an emergency 2.5 gallon rotopax fuel pack to give me an extra guaranteed 10+ miles of range.

    I carry a flat blade screwdriver and needle nose pliers for extracting from the pump and a spark plug wrench in case I need to get water out of the engine. I've never had to use any of it, but it's nice to know I have it all.

    Also, on anchoring, I keep a 200 foot rope and 15 lb boat anchor. I keep a large anchor buoy on the end of the rope so it's very easy to see and come back to later if you unhook from it fighting a fish. I've never been concerned about ingestion because the rope and buoy are easily visible. Just don't get a rope that floats because I can see a concern about ingesting a floating rope. Nylon ropes will sink so only the buoy will be on the surface. And I don't get off the ski to set the anchor or pull it up. I keep it in the front storage and just reach over the dash to pull it out. Put it in the footwell, then drop it in the water when I'm ready and let it set and then just pull it up by hand, by holding the rope in my hand and driving forward to break it loose just like you would on a boat.

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  12. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by wildebeest View Post
    You shouldn't have any concerns about the reliability of an FX. I fish offshore on a 2012 FXSHO and frequently go 20-30 miles offshore on my own without hesitation regarding the reliability of the ski or restarting the ski after drifting or anchoring for a few hours.

    I would just recommend taking safety precautions. I keep all of the following on my ski--but have never had to use any of these in an emergency, so perhaps it is overkill.

    An EPIRB, handheld marine radio, backup handheld marine radio, a second battery wired on an ACR to be combined for extra starting power if necessary (both Deka AGM), an extra 1100 GPH bilge pump installed that I can manually switch (along with the stock automatic 500 GHP bilge pump), garmin GPS/fishfinder, cellphone with garmin app as a backup gps, an emergency 2.5 gallon rotopax fuel pack to give me an extra guaranteed 10+ miles of range.

    I carry a flat blade screwdriver and needle nose pliers for extracting from the pump and a spark plug wrench in case I need to get water out of the engine. I've never had to use any of it, but it's nice to know I have it all.

    Also, on anchoring, I keep a 200 foot rope and 15 lb boat anchor. I keep a large anchor buoy on the end of the rope so it's very easy to see and come back to later if you unhook from it fighting a fish. I've never been concerned about ingestion because the rope and buoy are easily visible. Just don't get a rope that floats because I can see a concern about ingesting a floating rope. Nylon ropes will sink so only the buoy will be on the surface. And I don't get off the ski to set the anchor or pull it up. I keep it in the front storage and just reach over the dash to pull it out. Put it in the footwell, then drop it in the water when I'm ready and let it set and then just pull it up by hand, by holding the rope in my hand and driving forward to break it loose just like you would on a boat.

    Thanks, I appreciate your feedback on your setup. You gave me good ideas on what else to consider bringing along. Where do you connect the anchor to once you set it? Also, how do your store your anchor rope?
    Do you have any pictures of your FX with your fishing setup? Just interested to see what it looks like.

    EDIT:
    I found another recent post where you linked your YouTube channel and watched a video of you and your wife riding in windy and choppy seas. That was a good video for me to watch. It pretty much answered all of my questions above, and more. I was curious how the WaveRunner handles in rough seas with gear and someone on the back and your video gave me a good idea.
    I'm trying to be real with what I'm looking for and my expectations. Of course we want the smoothest ride possible in rough seas, but getting that out of any small craft, boat or PWC, in rough waters will be tough. The main thing for me is the craft gets be back to shore safely. When I'm diving anywhere, I'm usually roughing it in some shape or form and don't mind the rough water ride to get back if that needs to happen. The benefit for me is I get to the grounds I want to get to and be able to get back safely.
    Last edited by musubi; 09-18-2020 at 01:03 PM.


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