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  1. #31
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris1200 View Post
    On my continental there is enough width between the bunks to remove the plate, can you guys adjust that separation in your trailers?

    Attachment 476218
    Are the bunk boards positioned in between the hull strake ridges?

  2. #32
    Eric Kern's Avatar
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  3. #33
    txgp1300r's Avatar
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    hey ! good job on your ingenuity ! now we can start a thread on modified come-along verses stock come-along , chains vs straps etc ! which tree holds the best ! sometimes removing the ride plate allows more access for part removal. good job anyway !

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Are the bunk boards positioned in between the hull strake ridges?
    Almost there…. One side is inside and the other over the ridge. I bought this ski a couple of weeks ago, first time I look into this. I think I can make it fit exactly inside the ridges without obstructing the rideplate though

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  6. #36
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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  8. #37
    Eric Kern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Good info, my dealer royally f***** my Triton setup when they gave It to me, just looks like they didn’t put any thought into It. Front stop rollers were tightly tucked under the black nose trim, so bad while I was winching the ski out of the water the rollers would’ve pressed against the nose of my front hatch, above the nose, so I had to lift the ski and winch at the same time just to get It under. Also had 190lbs of tongue weight assuming for 21 GPSVHO w/audio, 10%=110lbs-ish. Anyways, got the roller stops down to wedge between the lower lip and top of tow “eye” on ski….seems very stable their. Also pushed the whole winch assembly forward about three inches, that got the tongue weight down to 140lbs, may move It more just ran out of time.

    (Seperately, saw the orange covers you added to the rear Triton step pads, well, already learned the hard way what those are capable of doing, nice gouge in my otherwise pristine hull. Have my shop making me some nice smooth/rounded Delrin caps to bolt over them to eliminate the issue!)

    -E

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  9. #38
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Kern View Post
    Good info, my dealer royally f***** my Triton setup when they gave it to me,

    just looks like they didn’t put any thought into it.
    They probably did not. At many dealers the guy assembling the trailers (they arrive at the dealer tightly stacked for efficient transport, essentially as kits) is a low wage ‘new guy’. He has no idea (and possibly no interest) regarding which PWC is going to go on which trailer.

    He may have fifty trailers to get assembled, and he just goes at it.

    When it comes time to lower your newly purchased PWC onto the trailer (many dealers use a forklift and sling) the primary goal is get it loaded quickly so everyone can get on to whatever is next needing doing. Nobody is checking the bunk spacing, the winch post settings, or anything else, really.

    It is up to you to verify that;

    The trailer was actually assembled properly. Loose (or entirely missing) bolts and nuts happen.

    That the trailer frame is not damaged, bent, twisted. The fenders are straight, the bracket welds not cracked.

    That the bunk spacing matches the hull. You want the wood bunks to sit between the raised hull strake ridges. It is not uncommon to find a hull with the strake edges digging into the bunk carpet. Often owners have no idea anything is incorrect and they use the trailer like that for years.

    That the winch post and bow roller are correctly positioned relative to the bow eye.

    That the tongue weight is within range. Heavier than target tongue weight is OK from a towing safety perspective. The safety concern is with tongues that are very lightly weighted as that can create hazardous handing dynamics at highway speeds and especially during sudden lane changes and/or hard braking.

    Speaking of tongue weight, when hooked up to your vehicle the trailer frame should be level. Not tongue angled downwards. A mild upward tilt at the tongue is OK but best is trailer level. You may need to buy a different ball mount if your current ball height is not a match for your new trailer.

    That the wheel lug nuts are not installed incorrectly with the cone side facing outward

    That the wheel nuts are actually torqued to spec.

    That the trailer tires are fully inflated. For most trailers the maximum pressure specified on the sidewall (assuming factory spec tires are installed) is the air pressure to be used in the tires.

    That the trailer lights not only all work and are not damaged, but also that none of the wiring has been damaged in transport, assembly, or generally shunting the trailer around.

    That the tension adjustment for the trailer coupler is set as snug as possible for you tow ball. Just enough release slack to uncouple the trailer. This tension minimizes the amount of mechanical slop and clunking noise from the coupler while towing.

    On many couplers the clamp tension adjustment is a nut on the underside of the coupler, only visible from below.

    Basically, evaluate every trailer as if it was assembled with indifference … which is quite possibly the case.

  10. #39
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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  11. #40
    Eric Kern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    They probably did not. At many dealers the guy assembling the trailers (they arrive at the dealer tightly stacked for efficient transport, essentially as kits) is a low wage ‘new guy’. He has no idea (and possibly no interest) regarding which PWC is going to go on which trailer.

    He may have fifty trailers to get assembled, and he just goes at it.


    When it comes time to lower your newly purchased PWC onto the trailer (many dealers use a forklift and sling) the primary goal is get it loaded quickly so everyone can get on to whatever is next needing doing. Nobody is checking the bunk spacing, the winch post settings, or anything else, really.

    It is up to you to verify that;

    The trailer was actually assembled properly. Loose (or entirely missing) bolts and nuts happen.

    That the trailer frame is not damaged, bent, twisted. The fenders are straight, the bracket welds not cracked.

    That the bunk spacing matches the hull. You want the wood bunks to sit between the raised hull strake ridges. It is not uncommon to find a hull with the strake edges digging into the bunk carpet. Often owners have no idea anything is incorrect and they use the trailer like that for years.

    That the winch post and bow roller are correctly positioned relative to the bow eye.

    That the tongue weight is within range. Heavier than target tongue weight is OK from a towing safety perspective. The safety concern is with tongues that are very lightly weighted as that can create hazardous handing dynamics at highway speeds and especially during sudden lane changes and/or hard braking.

    Speaking of tongue weight, when hooked up to your vehicle the trailer frame should be level. Not tongue angled downwards. A mild upward tilt at the tongue is OK but best is trailer level. You may need to buy a different ball mount if your current ball height is not a match for your new trailer.

    That the wheel lug nuts are not installed incorrectly with the cone side facing outward

    That the wheel nuts are actually torqued to spec.

    That the trailer tires are fully inflated. For most trailers the maximum pressure specified on the sidewall (assuming factory spec tires are installed) is the air pressure to be used in the tires.

    That the trailer lights not only all work and are not damaged, but also that none of the wiring has been damaged in transport, assembly, or generally shunting the trailer around.

    That the tension adjustment for the trailer coupler is set as snug as possible for you tow ball. Just enough release slack to uncouple the trailer. This tension minimizes the amount of mechanical slop and clunking noise from the coupler while towing.

    On many couplers the clamp tension adjustment is a nut on the underside of the coupler, only visible from below.

    Basically, evaluate every trailer as if it was assembled with indifference … which is quite possibly the case.
    All of that (bold) is 100% correct, they had the stacks of trailers, and I met the crew assembling them, definitely there for one purpose, assemble these as fast as you can any way you can. With that said, it is 100% the responsibility of the shop who SOLD me the ski and SOLD me the trailer to ensure it’s assembled correctly and safely, both the ski and the trailer. It’s my responsibility to double check they did the job right (solely due diligence). If i pulled out of the lot and the ski got damaged or worse the trailer fell apart and dropped the ski, that would without a doubt be on them to remedy.

    Put another way, a good shop is going to give you a product how It should be, bullshit is gonna give you bullshit. Hence they f***** me ����

    And yeah I had to switch from by 2” drop to 3.5 to level out more.

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