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  1. #1

    Virage Txi won't start. Troubleshooting fuel pump

    Boat sat for 2 years. Had trouble pumping out the gas, so I tried to start. It started! I attributed it to the premium I always use to fill these. Took it out to the lake a day later and it ran for 15 minutes and died. Would not start back up. Drained battery trying.

    Got it back home and I checked fuel pressure while trying to start. No fuel pressure. I suspect I was on the right port. No other Schrader available to check. So I pull tank, get pump out and decide to bench test it to see if I did something wrong. I've rarely troubleshot fuel pressure problems. I put gas in a bucket, hooked discharge line to gauge and it pumped up to 26# and held. Took some cranks to get up there, but it got there. Maybe would've gone higher if I continue to crank.

    Is my fuel pump good? Was it bad gas? Something else? Would love to fix this thing but if it's too complicated, I guess I need to sell seeing as how parts are so hard to find.

    This is a 2001 Virage Txi fuel injected 3 cylinder Ficht engine.


  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Details on the test rig for fuel pump?
    Hose looped from fuel pump out to fuel pump return, with pressure tester on a T connection?

    Took several cranks? You used the watercraft wire harness for the fuel pump test?

    The fuel pump is electric. As soon as the air purges from the fuel hose circuit the pressure should stabilize at 23PSI (give or take a couple PSI). With the fuel hoses fully filled with liquid gasoline (as they normally would be) the fuel pressure should spike to full pressure within a second or two of electric power being applied to the fuel pump.

    Since you have the pump assembly out, inspect the fuel intake mesh screen inside the pump motor bottom end.

    Also confirm what voltage the fuel pump is actually receiving (between the +12 volt wire and Brown wire, at the fuel pump connector) when the engine is cranking. It should be no more than maybe 1 volt less than the battery voltage, and the battery should be delivering around 11 volts while cranking.

    Be VERY careful with electricity around an open container of gasoline !

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  4. #3
    Thanks for the reply. Glad to see you're still around. We've conversed a few years ago. I did not hook to return. I just dead headed discharge tube into gauge. It slowly worked it's way up to the peak pressure. Yes I used the wiring harness to crank. Got some other errands to run right now, but I'll see if I can check voltage. There's four wires on the harness. I guess I'll just check them all. I'll check screen as well.

  5. #4
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    A dead headed electric fuel pump is going to trap air in the pump and test hose to the gauge. Not a particularly useful test.

    You need to verify the Ficht fuel pump can quickly create and then maintain the expected fuel pressure while flowing fuel through the return fitting, with the working pressure regulator mounted inside.

    There is only one +12 volt wire at the fuel pump connector, on opposite side from the Brown wire. And the Brown wire should be just above 0 volts (relative to the metal engine case) when the engine is cranking, with a strong battery.

    With the engine quiet the Brown wire at fuel pump will (should) have full battery voltage.

  6. #5
    martincom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Since you have the pump assembly out, inspect the fuel intake mesh screen inside the pump motor bottom end.
    Ditto checking the intake screen. This is becoming an ever more prevalent problem with today's gasolines-----especially when they sit for prolonged periods. See this thread for details.

  7. #6

    I think we got it, but...

    Okay...Red wire with white stripe to ground, 13V, drops to 11 during crank.
    Red wire to Ground 3.5V-cranking or not
    blk to ground. 0 volts, cranking or not. I suspect that's a ground.
    Brown-ground. 13v then drops to 5 when cranking.
    Look at this strainer. I think that's it, although I would have guessed that pleated filter would've prevented that. Also look at other pic and I'd sure like some advice on fixing that fitting.
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  8. #7

    Extra part!

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    Last edited by Keithtas; 07-24-2020 at 03:26 PM. Reason: figured this problem out

  9. #8
    martincom's Avatar
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    Your voltage measurements appear OK with the exception of the brown wire. This is the switched ground, from the EMM, that turns on the fuel pump. It should be dropping lower than 5.0 volts when cranking---closer to zero. The red/white wire supplies power to the fuel pump. At 11.0 volts during cranking, minus the voltage drop on the brown lead/EMM, means the fuel pump is only being powered by 6.0 volts. So something is not correct.

    Disconnect the large, 40 pin connector, from the EMM. With the fuel canister connected to the harness, ground pin 40 (brown wire) with a test lead. Be careful not to distort the pin receptacle within the 40 pin connector. Measure the voltage at the fuel canister connector brown wire. If it is still 5.0 volts or close to that, you have a voltage drop problem in the wiring. If close to zero, continue.

    Repeat the same step as above, but this time ground pin 40 (brown wire) through the currect function of your meter. An OEM fuel pump will typically draw 2.0 amps. We have often seen aftermarket so-called direct replacements draw far too much current, as much as 7.0 amps. 4.0 amps is about the maximum the EMM switching circuits can reliably control. If your pump draws excessive current, this would explain the 5 volt measurement at the brown connector. Considering your canister nipples have been broke off and a repair attempt made on them, it leads to me suspect the fuel pump has been replaced and is one of those problematic aftermarket pumps that draw excessive current.

    I believe I have one nylon hose nipple head piece remaining in my supply of spare parts. Before we talk money, let's wait and see if your pump draws current with an acceptable range.

    The pleated filter does not fit real snug on the bottom of the canister, so it is not surprising the small crud gets by it. I would suggest pumping out/bailing out the tank to the extent possible, then mopping out what is left with paper towels, picking up any visible contaminants. Let dry and then wipe out with a wood finishing tack rag, which are availabe at most home improvement, paint, & hardware stores. Any contaminants left in the tank will quickly plug the intake screen. It does not take much.

  10. #9
    martincom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keithtas View Post
    This is sitting on my tailgate. Where I took fuel pump apart. For the life of me, I can't figure out where this goes.
    It is the fuel pressure regulator. We were getting to that. It is a common problem that the hose nipple becomes loose and falls out of the nylon nipple head piece---the same one that has been broken and a makeshift repair attempted. To correct and reinforce this, see this thread for details.

  11. #10
    Trying to understand all that. Sorry, I'm not that technical on DC stuff. I don't see how two different power sources to the pump make sense, unless there's a relay, as if the brown wire energizes a relay and then the red/white powers it up. For now, it's not important I understand it. I will say that brown wire goes straight to the level sensor, if that makes any difference.

    I'm willing to talk about price on that fitting and chance I don't have any electrical problems. I'm not sure I want to spend the time or the money to do that myself or pay someone to chase an electrical problem down.

    You have a website or a phone we can talk?

    Thanks

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