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  1. #11
    Yea, I figured that part out. Stuck it back in. Was a tight fit, and I like that pipe threaded solution on your attached thread.

    This also makes me wonder if that fell out during my trip and didn't notice it in the bottom of the fuel pump.

  2. #12
    martincom's Avatar
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    The red/white wire come directly from the battery, via a circuit breaker. So it is hot all the time and does not turn off with the engine. The brown wire is the ground path from the fuel pump. The EMM closes the ground connection to turn on the fuel pump and opens it to turn it off. Typically, switching is done on the hot side of things, but in this case it is on the ground side.

    The black wire is the ground connection for the fuel level sender. The red wire (actually pink) is the feed from the fuel gauge to the sender.

    I sold one of those nylon head pieces to another member who cracked his when tapping/installing the hose barb in it. I tapped it, supplied and installed the hose barb and shipped it for $45. Bear in mind, I store my extra parts at a warehouse I may get near once a week and I was just there this morning. So it could be a few days, which for most PWC operators is an eternity this time of year. I won't tolerate any whining about when I get to it.

    It would be much better if you have a friend with some electrical knowledge that could make the measurements for you and, if need be, I could converse with. Trying to teach you electronics over the phone will be challenging and the measurements will be questionable.

    No website. I'm semi-retired. Mostly retired, according to my bride.


  3. #13
    Thanks. I'm going to put this back together and try my luck. I'll keep you posted.

  4. #14
    martincom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keithtas View Post
    Thanks. I'm going to put this back together and try my luck. I'll keep you posted.

    I would strongly encourage you NOT to. Those broken head piece nipples are a tragedy just waiting to happen. They could easily break or crack again and the fuel pump would be pumping gasoline into the hull, a confined space. Hull temperatures are, obviously, quite warm and the gasoline will vaporize quickly. It won't take much to create an explosion. If you survive the blast, you'll likely be unconscious and drown.

    It is just not worth your life to be in a hurry.

  5. #15
    Agree. Couldn’t do anything I was comfortable enough fixing the fitting. Would like for you to check on that new fitting when you get around to it. If you had a new complete pump, I may be interested in that as well. In the meantime, I may find the 40 pin connector and follow previous instructions. Thanks

  6. #16
    martincom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keithtas View Post
    Agree. Couldn’t do anything I was comfortable enough fixing the fitting. Would like for you to check on that new fitting when you get around to it. If you had a new complete pump, I may be interested in that as well. In the meantime, I may find the 40 pin connector and follow previous instructions. Thanks

    Yes, I have a complete fuel canister and that is why I suggested checking the pump current draw before we discussed the nylon head piece, as the canister will include that.

    You can find illustrations of where the EMM 40 pin connector is located as well as pin-outs here.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by martincom View Post
    Your voltage measurements appear OK with the exception of the brown wire. This is the switched ground, from the EMM, that turns on the fuel pump. It should be dropping lower than 5.0 volts when cranking---closer to zero. ...
    Good morning. So I begin to start my next step looking for 40 pin connector. Decided to double check voltage--Brown to ground. Today it is 13 without a load and 2 while cranking. Hope that's better.

    Honestly, I don't know that my original post of dropping to 5 was accurate. I'm using a Simpson analog meter and with all the different scales on it, I think I just glanced and decided it was 5. Had I known that drop was to be that critical, I would've looked closer. In my normal line of work, big voltage drops while putting a load on a motor is bad, but you teach me that in this case, the bigger the drop the better.

    Would like to know your new thoughts on this. Sorry to have mislead, but I didn't think that measurement was that critical.

    Thanks.

  8. #18
    martincom's Avatar
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    While definitely better, 2.0 volts on the brown wire (pin 40 of the EMM) still seems high. To be honest, I've never had to measure it, but it just seems higher than I would expect for this application. Perhaps someone else will chime in who has actually measured it.

    We had a number of strange problems reported by members, about two years ago, and they all were aftermarket fuel pumps that were drawing far too much current. As you are this far into this and evidence of it being disassembled in the past, it would only be prudent to measure the current draw of the fuel pump.

    I have several Simpson analog VOMs and they arr my "go to" meter. Often, the way in which the meter movement is responding will tell a lot about what is happening. So I have learned to interpret. Also, I worked in RF (radio frequency) transmitters most of my career and the RF energy would cause digital meters to display erroneous readings.

    Which model Simpson do you have?

  9. #19
    Which model Simpson do you have?[/QUOTE]

    I have the Model 260 series 7. Bought it in the early 80's. I too prefer the analog. Seeing a needle move is much better than seeing a digital bounce around numbers.

    At any rate, I looked at it closer and it's dancing around. 1-2 volts I guess. I understand now. If there's an open on the ground side, we get 12 volts across the "open". When we close it, we should get 0. I know you've said it, but it didn't click. It shouldn't have any potential, but it does, like I said, 1-2.

    So I figured out a way to bench test this pump by bypassing the broken fitting to the back pressure regulator "temporarily". Like before, I set it in a bucket of gas, hooked up gauge, and instead of dead heading, I hooked up the return back pressure regulator. Battery is limited to how long it'll crank without going dead, but it pumped to 24# with nothing coming out of regulator. Then I found a post from K447 on which two wires to jump to make it run without running engine. It got up to ~30# and regulator lifted. All good, right? I just need the fitting you think you have and I think I can put this fuel pressure thing to bed. Hope it was that dirty strainer or I'll be starting a new thread on what to do next.

  10. #20
    martincom's Avatar
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    I'd still check the pump current draw. To do this, you put the Simpson in series (so the electricity is flowing through the Simpson.) First, you need to configure the Simpson to read current. Remove the black meter lead from the Simpson common jack and transfer it to the -10A jack. Move the read lead to the +10A jack. Rotate the selector dial to 10 amps (I believe that position is shared with 10 milliamps.) Rotate the voltage switch to DC+. You can utilize your previous test setup from K447's post, but now have your Simpson setup in the path

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