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  1. #1

    Engine questions

    So Iím not sure if this is the right spot or not but I recently bought a pair of gp 800s. One is a 99 and the other is a 01. They both didnít run but came with a trailer and the 99 has 35 hours and the 01 has 37. The 01 has a lot of water in the engine and they havenít been registered since 2013. Iím not really sure of anything else as the history of them goes but they both costed 400 with the trailer. Couldnít pass that up. They both crank over strong. The 99 has 120 up front and 119 in the back for compression. The 01 has 150 in the back and 180 up front but I wasnít able to verify that all the water is out so Iím not sure if that is completely accurate. Any help would be greatly appreciated guys. Also if this is in the wrong spot Iím sorry. But thanks.

  2. #2
    raiderteen's Avatar
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    Compression numbers will be inaccurate (read high) with any significant amount of liquid in the cylinders. (Less available volume=higher compression).

    You should be looking for 115-130 range on those in good shape. With both within 5%-10% of each other.

    As for the water situation. How did the water get there? If the first thing you did was put batteries in them, pull the plugs, and crank over to find water shooting out of the cylinders then you might have bigger underlying issues. Water for any extended period of time in the cylinders & crankcase means rust development. Bearings and rings don't like that at all.

    I would highly recommend pulling the cylinder heads off and inspecting the cylinders at a minimum. You can usually get by with reusing the head gaskets at least once as long as it doesn't get trashed on removal or show any signs of blow-by/leaking.

    If you confirm there was water in the crankcase then, unfortunately, that means the crank needs further inspection and complete motor pull/tear down. Would hate for you to get it running simply because "it cranks over strong" then end up throwing a rod and doing more damage then you started with due to crank/rod bearings with rust development that overheated and went kaboom.

  3. #3
    Mike's GPR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raiderteen View Post
    Compression numbers will be inaccurate (read high) with any significant amount of liquid in the cylinders. (Less available volume=higher compression).

    You should be looking for 115-130 range on those in good shape. With both within 5%-10% of each other.

    As for the water situation. How did the water get there? If the first thing you did was put batteries in them, pull the plugs, and crank over to find water shooting out of the cylinders then you might have bigger underlying issues. Water for any extended period of time in the cylinders & crankcase means rust development. Bearings and rings don't like that at all.

    I would highly recommend pulling the cylinder heads off and inspecting the cylinders at a minimum. You can usually get by with reusing the head gaskets at least once as long as it doesn't get trashed on removal or show any signs of blow-by/leaking.

    If you confirm there was water in the crankcase then, unfortunately, that means the crank needs further inspection and complete motor pull/tear down. Would hate for you to get it running simply because "it cranks over strong" then end up throwing a rod and doing more damage then you started with due to crank/rod bearings with rust development that overheated and went kaboom.
    I second that!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike's GPR View Post
    I second that!
    so I pulled the heads off of the 01 and they look like this. The carbs are not that good they have almost a jelly like substance in there. I’m guessing the 01 is shot since the water could have been in there for a longggg time.

  5. #5
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  6. #6
    raiderteen's Avatar
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    Those cylinders (if original) and pistons are all aluminum with Nikasil Coating. Good chance any rust/corrosion you see will come off very easily and not need any honing (special honing required for that coating). But if there is any damage/nicks in the cylinder walls then they can be sent off for repair/recoating. Highly recommended not to use SBT remanufactured or any other remanufactured cylinders that use a steel liner.

    The issue you are going to find with that water, is the rings rusting and the crank rusting. I'd yank the motor out and do a full tear down and go from there. Everything needs inspected at this point.

  7. #7
    steve45's Avatar
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    Yep, that crankshaft will be toast. Hey, at least you got a trailer!

  8. #8
    Well I definitely was hoping it wouldn’t be toast but everything I’ve read and what you guys say is just pointing towards a no go situation. But true at least I got a trailer. I am probably going to pull that motor this week. I don’t have much experience with this stuff. Is it worth pulling or just kinda scrapping it? I would love to be able to get it running but is it more a bad idea to even try and a waste of money? Thanks I appreciate the help you guys can give me.

  9. #9
    Myself's Avatar
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    Seems to me that for the money, you could completely overhaul both skis....learn them inside and out......and have a couple nice skis that will last many years. I have seen several times in the past where an engine is so full of water that the crank was completely submerged. Theres not an abundance of oxygen in the water. AND....if there was enough oily residue coating everything then it might be OK. Wishful but I've seen it!! Full teardown and inspection time. Order a shop service manual, you can do this.


  10. #10
    steve45's Avatar
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    Pull off the intake manifold and look at the crankshaft carefully. The bearings should be clean and shiny. If you see any rust on them, it's toast. You'll have to get the crank(s) rebuilt or buy exchange cranks.

    This can be a fun project if you plan to keep them. I've rebuilt a couple that I gave to my nephews. I've also rebuilt several to sell and lost my butt on all but one.

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