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  1. #11

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    In a related topic... I wonder if it's necessary to drain the fuel or if using stabilizer will keep the fuel good for a long time.

    Last summer, I picked up a Kawasaki STX-DI with a reg that expired in 2008. The motor had seized, the ski sat for years and the fuel in the tank was dark yellow. I drained it out (with a siphon since the pump was shot). I was curious to see if the fuel was good, so I poured a little into a pan and lit it. It burned up, so I tried some in the lawnmower and the mower ran with no problem. I have no idea whether the fuel had been stabilized, but it had to be almost 12 years old.

  2. #12
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    A lawn mower engine can run on very degraded gasoline.

    Doesn't mean the gasoline was still 'good' for use in a high power engine.

  3. #13

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    I wasn't planning to use it in the ski, which is why I siphoned it out.

    The point was that this was an extreme situation and the gasoline wasn't totally useless.

    Here in NY, the boat and skis sit for 8-9 months with stabilizer added to whatever fuel is left in the tank, usually added to fuel that's been in the tank for a month or two. It's never been a problem the following season. The OP mentioned a much shorter layup time. For now, stabilizer might be a better alternative to siphoning. No matter how careful you are, handling gasoline has its risks.
    Last edited by grumpy_steven; 01-29-2020 at 04:13 PM.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by grumpy_steven View Post
    I wasn't planning to use it in the ski, which is why I siphoned it out.

    The point was that this was an extreme situation and the gasoline wasn't totally useless.

    Here in NY, the boat and skis sit for 8-9 months with stabilizer added to whatever fuel is left in the tank, usually added to fuel that's been in the tank for a month or two. It's never been a problem the following season. The OP mentioned a much shorter layup time. For now, stabilizer might be a better alternative to siphoning. No matter how careful you are, handling gasoline has its risks.
    thats what I do put Yamaha ring free in there on my last ride and run it down pretty far then when the season starts I go fill up and make sure I run that 1st tank down to empty.

    i have had gas sit in my skiis for 7 months before with no issues

  5. #15

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    My point exactly. The OP indicates that the layup will be 6-7 months, which is not excessive. Not sure how much fuel is in his tanks, but stabilizer now and topping off in the spring might be a better answer than draining the tanks.


  6. #16

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    Guys, the last time I had any of my skis out on the water was on 5 Nov 19. Not quite 3 months as of this writing. Three other skis probably have been sitting idle since sometime in September. That being said, I don't know when I fueled up any of the skis. The 5 Nov skis were fueled up at least a 1-3 months prior to the last run. I'm sure that at least one or two of them was last fueled up about 6 months ago so the fuel is getting some age. I know the fuel will burn but I get a little uncomfortable with aged fuel, more specifically crapola ethanol gas! My skis usually have only two throttle positions: idle and WOT. For the WOT, which is most of the time, I'd be more comfortable with fresh gasoline.

    Over the many years that I've owned my two 2-stroke skis, I've siphoned fuel out of them when I wanted/needed to. Kind of a pain (GP1200) but not too bad. There is no easy way to siphon fuel out of the newer 4-strokes that I have. K447's fuel pump wire harness is a really nice solution. Doesn't cost too much but it'll allow me to remove the fuel whenever I start to get uncomfortable with it. I'll then just burn the older fuel in one of my cars.

  7. #17
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyual777 View Post
    ... remove the fuel whenever I start to get uncomfortable with it. ...
    I will mention that after you pump out the old fuel, you want to either completely mop out the tank to perfectly dry. Or promptly refill it with fresh gasoline (non-ethanol preferred) and add a quality fuel stabilizer.

    Why? Unlike 2-strokes, the 4-stroke Yamaha has an electric fuel pump inside the fuel tank. It has steel parts.

    When submerged in fuel the air/oxygen above the liquid cannot cause corrosion to the fuel pump. With the tank 'mostly' empty not only can air get at the fuel pump, there may be some moisture with the ethanol dregs in the tank.

    Some members have reported, with photos, corroded/rusted fuel pumps.

  8. #18

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    K447, thank you for that advice. I hadn't thought of that. All three of my 4-strokes are sitting at about 1/3-1/2 tank right now.

  9. #19

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    Wow... if your skis are sitting that long, you need to address more than just the fuel. Hopefully, you fogged the motors. Two Yamaha motor killers are valve corrosion and sticking piston rings, both of which are often caused by failure to fog before long-term storage and both of which will result in low compression.

    Given clarification of the time frame that the fuel has been in your skis, I agree that it's a good idea to drain the tanks. If you use the fuel pump, it will get all but a few ounces of fuel out of the tank so completely drying it out is easy. Yes, although the fuel pumps are mostly plastic, they have parts that can oxidize, so it's a good idea to take steps to prevent that. I haven't encountered the problem during winter storage, but longer term storage might be a different story. Keep in mind that even if you dry the tank, condensation can form on the metal parts. As a general rule, ventilation usually helps, but I can't say whether it's a good idea to vent the tank.

    Not sure abut the VX, but the FX fuel tanks have a black rubber cap towards the rear of the tank. It's easy to remove and is a great access point for siphoning the fuel using something other than the fuel pump. I usually add stabilizer directly to the fuel through that opening.

  10. #20
    I bump my ski once a week idk in u have access to yours though

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