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  1. #21
    martincom's Avatar
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    I've never seen that "tea bag" filter in any of the units I've disassembled and that has been a number. The fuel pressure regulator (FPR) literally falling off is a common problem. Polaris never sold piece parts of the fuel canister, just the entire assembly. It was a bit pricey. The same style of canister was utilized in a number of automotive applications. So my concern would be if someone replaced the canister assembly with what they thought was a "close" enough automotive type to save some money.

    What we have found is all the automotive replacements we (Greenhulk members) have tested draw far too much current. Likewise, a number of the so-called "direct replacements" sold on ebay and other places draw far too much current. The excessive current drain causes the fuel pump driver, within the EMM, to overheat, resulting in its shutting down and generating error codes or, worse yet, failing all together. Also, the excessive current drain creates issues with battery charging, as the 12 volt section of the stator/EMM has a 10 amp capacity.

    I'd disassemble your canister to get it down to the pump itself and set it up to check the current draw while actually pumping fluid. Don't utilize gasoline, it is too explosive if you should have an arc generated by your test leads. Don't utilize water, either. I use mineral spirits. The pump should draw approximately 2.0 amps. You'll want to check/clean the intake screen at the base of the pump, regardless.

    If your pumps draws excessive current, see the thread in the stickies in this regard and potential aftermarket replacements.

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  3. #22
    Bogartin''s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martincom View Post
    I've never seen that "tea bag" filter in any of the units I've disassembled and that has been a number. The fuel pressure regulator (FPR) literally falling off is a common problem. Polaris never sold piece parts of the fuel canister, just the entire assembly. It was a bit pricey. The same style of canister was utilized in a number of automotive applications. So my concern would be if someone replaced the canister assembly with what they thought was a "close" enough automotive type to save some money.


    I noticed the brand name on the pumps housing is Carter. I'll check the amperage when I get some mineral oil. This would make sense. Previous owner said it wouldn't go over 35 mph last time he took it out. Think the EMM may have overheated sending it to limp mode.

  4. #23
    martincom's Avatar
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    Carter was the source vendor. However, they were also the source vendor for the automotive applications.

  5. #24
    Bogartin''s Avatar
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    The fuel pump under load pulled 1.28 amps.

  6. #25
    Moderator HiPeRcO's Avatar
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    That's REALLY low. Was it making 25psi into the fuel pressure regulator?

  7. #26
    Bogartin''s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiPeRcO View Post
    That's REALLY low. Was it making 25psi into the fuel pressure regulator?

    I'm not sure, I tested it in a container outside the ski. Previous owner said last time he rode it it wouldn't go over 35, I ran it for maybe 10 seconds and it didn't want to idle unless I stayed on the throttle a little bit. If I should be seeing 2 amps is it safe to assume I probably have a failing fuel pump?


    Has anyone had any luck with the aftermarket Quantum pumps by chance?

  8. #27
    Moderator HiPeRcO's Avatar
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    Proper test is current draw under load (25psi). Otherwise hard to conclude anything.


  9. #28
    martincom's Avatar
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    In one of the threads in regards to fuel pumps, I measured and posted the no load current draw of the pump as well as the stalled (pump output pinched off) current load. I didn't author the thread, so it is not any easier for me to search for than you. I would suggest you utilize google or some other search engine other than the search tool within the forum. In my opinion, anything beyond a simple one word search makes it worthless.

    Also, the current draw will vary somewhat, depending on supply voltage.

    I'd suggest you attach the pressure regulator to the output fitting of the pump and re-measure the current draw, utilizing your test set up with mineral spirits as the fluid. If the regulator hasn't fallen out, usually it doesn't take much more than a gentle tug to pull the barb out of the nylon head piece. Perhaps there is enough of the head piece barb that you can secure a test hose to. Also, the tubing/hose that connects to the pressure regulator becomes much more pliable when warmed with a heat gun.

    Another member had provided some data as to the current draw of the Quantum pump and it certainly appeared to be a viable replacement. Then another member posted less than favorable results when utilizing it as a replacement. However, in my opinion, that particular member often reported contradictory results of various tests and did not seem to have a good grasp of what he was doing. So I take his reports with a grain salt. As such, I'm not 100% sure a Quantum pump is a viable replacement, but short of a used pump, it is the only potential replacement I'm aware of.

  10. #29
    martincom's Avatar
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    25 psi is the normal running pressure of the pump/regulator combination. Pinching off the pump output (return line), before the regulator, typically produces 35 psi.

  11. #30
    Bogartin''s Avatar
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    Re-tested the pump with the pressure regulator on and it pulled 2.1 A. Going to get the fuel system back together and pressure test it.

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