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  1. #1

    Unhappy Help with my 03 Polaris Genesis I direct injection

    Cant figure out how to make a new post but I have a problem with my jet ski. Itll crank over and start for less then a second then die. I can keep it running (very rough) with starter fluid but normally itll backfire loudly out the exhaust. I'm new to jet skis so I need help what to look for. It's a 03 Polaris Genesis I direct injection.

  2. #2
    Moderator HiPeRcO's Avatar
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    Welcome to Greenhulk!

    Backfiring is almost always caused by an EMM issue. (I replied to your PM about EMM repairs).

    Be sure to check your exhaust resonators, they can be damaged by backfires.

  3. #3
    This is how I run a jetski shop in the desert nmpeter's Avatar
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    and for pete's sake DO NOT USE starter fluid!

    I'd say that you've likely split a resonator already

    the only way to start a balky ski is to put a single teaspoon of fuel down each plughole.

    While my finger is wagging, I'll warn you that ski has heart a stopping ignition system.

    Never put yourself in a position to be shocked by it.

    if you've jump started it at any time, just pull the emm and send it to lakeside.

    Backfiring in my experience has always been an emm problem.

    and read up on the skis motor and fuel injection system

    there are plenty of threads here on the topic

    last warning. the backfiring is potent. I lost hearing in one of my ears for a week before I learned MY lesson. I always wear hearing protection when a fuel injected no start comes into my shop.

    I blew up a seadoo plastic exhaust resonator once, due to a leaky fuel injector. A bit of it was found embedded in the shop ceiling

    if you have a damaged resonator, be warned that they are difficult to replace, and you cana't run the ski if one is damaged. it will put enough exhaust into the hull to stop the motor in short order

  4. #4
    What is the issue with jump starting? I have not jump started mine before, just curious why you can't do it, and what you should do if your battery dies overnight and you are somewhere without a battery charger?

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rileypeck View Post
    What is the issue with jump starting? I have not jump started mine before, just curious why you can't do it, and

    what you should do if your battery dies overnight and you are somewhere without a battery charger?
    You buy a high quality AGM battery, and it does not die overnight

    One problem with jump starting is the potential for voltage spikes every time the jumper cables connect (and maybe fall off) the watercraft battery terminals.

    AND, should the engine actually start, suddenly the very simple PWC charging circuit is trying to push heavy charge current into the ‘dead’ battery. As you unclip the boost battery, the electrical load on the charging circuit changes suddenly, risking a spike.

    During cranking the combination of jumper cable+clamp resistance and the starter motor’s heavy amp draw can cause the voltage in the electrical box to jump around.

    When starting using a good battery properly installed in the watercraft, the battery acts not only as a source of power but also a voltage and current damper. The short heavy battery wires and the healthy battery basically act as a voltage clamp.

    When the installed battery is depleted, it cannot provide the same stabilizing effect on the voltage in the watercraft electrical system.

    The situation can be worse if there is no battery in the ski at all - the long jumper cables and resistive clamps can allow the system voltages to spike up and down.

    In short, there are a bunch of scenarios where jump starting a watercraft results in toasted electrical components in the watercraft. Hence the standing advice to always install a healthy battery, rather than temp fate using a booster.

    If you MUST recover from a discharged watercraft battery and do not have access to a proper AC power battery charger, here is one alternative. Rather than ‘boosting’ the dead battery and attempting to quickly get the dead ski started, connect the ‘good’ 12 volt power source (car battery, whatever) and let it charge the watercraft battery. This will take some time.

    Eventually the ‘dead’ battery should have enough juice to crank and start the engine by itself, and hopefully has enough charge that the battery does not overload the charging circuit.

    If you have a lithium booster pack that has a decent amp-hour capacity (aka the ‘bigger pack’) then it may be able to charge the weak battery. Depends on the pack.

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  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    You buy a high quality AGM battery, and it does not die overnight

    One problem with jump starting is the potential for voltage spikes every time the jumper cables connect (and maybe fall off) the watercraft battery terminals.

    AND, should the engine actually start, suddenly the very simple PWC charging circuit is trying to push heavy charge current into the ‘dead’ battery. As you unclip the boost battery, the electrical load on the charging circuit changes suddenly, risking a spike.

    During cranking the combination of jumper cable+clamp resistance and the starter motor’s heavy amp draw can cause the voltage in the electrical box to jump around.

    When starting using a good battery properly installed in the watercraft, the battery acts not only as a source of power but also a voltage and current damper. The short heavy battery wires and the healthy battery basically act as a voltage clamp.

    When the installed battery is depleted, it cannot provide the same stabilizing effect on the voltage in the watercraft electrical system.

    The situation can be worse if there is no battery in the ski at all - the long jumper cables and resistive clamps can allow the system voltages to spike up and down.

    In short, there are a bunch of scenarios where jump starting a watercraft results in toasted electrical components in the watercraft. Hence the standing advice to always install a healthy battery, rather than temp fate using a booster.

    If you MUST recover from a discharged watercraft battery and do not have access to a proper AC power battery charger, here is one alternative. Rather than ‘boosting’ the dead battery and attempting to quickly get the dead ski started, connect the ‘good’ 12 volt power source (car battery, whatever) and let it charge the watercraft battery. This will take some time.

    Eventually the ‘dead’ battery should have enough juice to crank and start the engine by itself, and hopefully has enough charge that the battery does not overload the charging circuit.

    If you have a lithium booster pack that has a decent amp-hour capacity (aka the ‘bigger pack’) then it may be able to charge the weak battery. Depends on the pack.

    Good info, thank you! I keep a small jump pack with me just in case. I have the battery running more in my boat than it did on the ski, the reason I worry. If I have an issue and a bilge pump runs a lot overnight then it could deplete the battery. Is there any issue running a much larger battery? I have plenty of room...

  8. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rileypeck View Post
    ... the battery running more in my boat than it did on the ski, the reason I worry.

    If I have an issue and a bilge pump runs a lot overnight then it could deplete the battery.

    Is there any issue running a much larger battery? I have plenty of room...
    If you are really concerned about a boat bilge pump running all night, connect the bilge pump to an auxiliary battery.

    The engine start battery would then not be affected by overnight bilge pump activity.

    Auxiliary or ‘house’ batteries are a common arrangement on many larger boats, leaving the engine start battery ready for engine start, regardless of what happens to the house battery.


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