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  1. #1

    Any slick ideas for mounting a 3 way rotary bilgepump on a GP1800?

    I put in a bilge pump in my GP1800. I am using a BlowVision 3 position rotary switch. I was thinking of mounting it in the glove box or up under or aroungd the guages. Also I need to somehow drill a mounting hole with a square side, any tips on that?

  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Which bilge pump are you planning to install?

    My own preference is a bilge pump with electronic automatic water sensing, directly powered from the battery via an inline fuse holder. Bilge pump is always powered, always ready to sense water and begin pumping. Even sitting on the trailer. And especially when in the water.

    I cannot forget to enable/activate automatic mode, since it is always active.

    This eliminates the need for a bilge pump switch. No wiring to the front of the hull, and nothing complicating the use of the glovebox or its removal.

    I do have an inline Weatherpack type sealed connector so I can unplug the bilge pump during long term storage.

  3. #3
    I've already installed a Rule 800 GPM pump that has the auto sensing. It's a 3 wire and I have it configured to the Switch which I temporarily have zip tied to the flush hose. I originally had it wired just to the battery but I got to thinking if I hit a log or a manatee or something, I may want to turn it on before it goes through a water sensing cycle. I can also turn it off while it's trailered. It's on my mental check list to turn it to auto when I take the straps off before launching.

  4. #4
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommydogg View Post
    I've already installed a Rule 800 GPM pump that has the auto sensing.

    It's a 3 wire and I have it configured to the Switch which I temporarily have zip tied to the flush hose.

    I originally had it wired just to the battery but I got to thinking if I hit a log or a manatee or something, I may want to turn it on before it goes through a water sensing cycle.

    I can also turn it off while it's trailered. It's on my mental check list to turn it to auto when I take the straps off before launching.
    If the switch you intend to use is fully waterproof, you can mount it through the plastic upper shroud somewhere forward/beside the glove box lid. Remove the GP1800 glove box and seat, you can look underneath to avoid obstructions.

    Through plastic it should be fairly easy to shape the required mounting hole using a small triangle file and round file.

  5. #5
    Super Jim's Avatar
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    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I used this and just made a bracket to mount it on the rear of the engine valve cover. Just remove the mains seat to set to on, off, or automatic. Be sure to use an inline fuse.

  6. #6
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Super Jim View Post
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I used this and just made a bracket to mount it on the rear of the engine valve cover. ...
    Explosion Proof is the wiring standard for wiring inside a PWC hull. This is a different and higher requirement than typical boating ‘Marine grade’ wiring.

    PWC hulls are fully enclosed and are exempt from having a ventilation blower. This combination means that it is possible for gasoline fumes to accumulate inside the hull, especially if the fuel system were to develop a leak.

    PWC manufacturers therefore use fully sealed electrical connectors throughout the entire factory wiring system. No exposed metal contacts or wire ends. This is not just to keep water and corrosion out, it is also to prevent an arcing electrical contact from being able to ignite any fumes trapped inside the hull.

    http://greenhulk.net/forums/showthre...l=1#post999634

    Switches and wiring intended for use on boats assumes the area is fully ventilated. Wiring under a boat dash is open to the air and should not have fuel fumes present. Engine compartments on boats are required to be power ventilated so fuel fumes should be vented to the outside before activating other electrical gear in the compartment.

    Put another way, ‘marine grade’ switches and exposed wiring connections are not appropriate for use inside an enclosed and non-ventilated PWC hull.

    http://greenhulk.net/forums/showthre...=1#post1311325

    http://greenhulk.net/forums/showthre...=1#post1260374


  7. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    So, not like this.


  8. #8
    Super Jim's Avatar
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    Good comment K447. I guess the OP did ask for "slick" installations and mine may not fit that requirement. I'm just saying that's the way I did mine. And I'm comfortable with it.

    A couple points to make for clarification: 1) PWC hulls are self ventilating when in motion. So the hull gets completely ventilated every time you pull it to and form the water and while riding it. If it sat on a dock all the time I may be more concerned about a fuel leak and want to pull he seat before starting it up. 2) It's not the exposed wiring or connections that can cause a spark (unless of course they make contact with something metal). It's the opening and closing of contacts like in a switch. So in my case, if the switch is set to automatic and left that way, it can not cause a spark. To operate the switch I have to remove the seat (which is a good idea before and after each ride for a quick general inspection) which allows me to notice if there are any problems and give some ventilation.

    I saw a completely stock PWC that was docked full time explode when the owner started it. It had a bad fuel leak and something in the factory wiring or starter made a spark. It's rare but it can happen. Yes there are much better and more elaborate installations. The picture above is a great example of a nice professional wiring job. Nice work!
    Last edited by Super Jim; 06-21-2019 at 05:05 AM.

  9. #9
    Lake Lion
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    When I saw the title, I was hoping you were talking about a 20B.

  10. #10
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Super Jim View Post
    ...

    A couple points to make for clarification:
    1) PWC hulls are self ventilating when in motion. So the hull gets completely ventilated every time you pull it to and from the water and while riding it. If it sat on a dock all the time I may be more concerned about a fuel leak and want to pull the seat before starting it up.

    2) It's not the exposed wiring or connections that can cause a spark (unless of course they make contact with something metal). It's the opening and closing of contacts like in a switch. So in my case, if the switch is set to automatic and left that way, it can not cause a spark. To operate the switch I have to remove the seat (which is a good idea before and after each ride for a quick general inspection) which allows me to notice if there are any problems and give some ventilation.

    ...
    I wish PWC hulls were self-ventilating when the engine is not running. There are a couple of ventilation tubes that connect the outside air to the hull interior, down low inside the hull. Those are not sufficient to clear the hull of fuel fumes.

    The primary exit path for air in the hull is through the running engine. The running engine consumes air from inside the hull and expels it via the exhaust. When the engine is not running there is minimal ventilation flow, even when towing the PWC on a trailer at highway speeds. *

    This is why the Owner’s Manual requires the seat be lifted prior to starting the engine every time the machine is launched. This is honored in the breach by most owners, but there is a reason that is in there.




    Exposed electrical connections inside a watercraft hull can corrode and screw connections can loosen over time. Constant dampness combined with engine vibration can degrade exposed screw wiring. Electric current flowing through loose or resistive wire connections can spark.

    Surprisingly some ‘marine grade’ switches sold for boat use claim to be sealed (perhaps a rubber boot on the front) but the switch body is not immune to moisture entering from the back.


    I will mention that proper marine grade flexible stranded copper wire has every strand tinned. This is not the case with automotive wire and general purpose stranded wire. The tinning is there to minimize corrosion caused by moisture wicking along the wire core from the exposed ends. Over time non-tinned copper wire exposed to dampness will tend to blacken and degrade.


    * this is also why storing a PWC with the seat in place and bilge water inside results in dampness inside that evaporates very slowly.
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