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  1. #11
    Pain is fear leaving your body.... rlovebk's Avatar
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    Gonna get HOT


  2. #12
    TimeBandit's Avatar
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    As manufacturer's goals when originally developing these maps are multifaceted (fuel economy, temperature, mean-stress on internals, wide octane ranges, etc... and performance). Trade some of this off for narrower octane, poorer fuel economy, etc, etc.... you'd surely some tangible net-boost in performance.
    Good idea if adding a knock sensor, but as mention above a wide-band lambda logger should be added as well while developing/experimenting.
    Keep up the good work!

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by smokeysevin View Post
    Did you monitor afr or just do an incrimental bump of the fuel table?

    Sean
    Did not check AFR, but in the grand scheme of things it is not too important what the number is, but rather what the engine likes.
    I went 0.2 lambda (about 0.3 AFR) into the lean direction, and then right after that 0.2 to rich direction from the standard.
    No noticeable difference in top speed or rpm. This means that the standard maps are running pretty much what the engine likes. Richer is always somewhat safer of course.

    Quote Originally Posted by rlovebk View Post
    Gonna get HOT
    If you mean the engine, then actually it's going to get cold. On any spark-combustion engine advancing the ignition timing towards MBT will always reduce EGT (unless you hit knock, but that's a different story).
    This is simply due to the first law of thermodynamics. Getting more mechanical work out of the same air-fuel mixture means less energy wasted as heat.
    Also, the burn gets colder and laminar flame speed somewhat decreases as you get further away from lambda 1. This is due to evaporative cooling. Making the mixture richer further reduces EGT.
    Trivial concepts for anyone who has any experience calibrating internal combustion engines. I have been doing this every day for more than ten years.

    Quote Originally Posted by TimeBandit View Post
    As manufacturer's goals when originally developing these maps are multifaceted (fuel economy, temperature, mean-stress on internals, wide octane ranges, etc... and performance). Trade some of this off for narrower octane, poorer fuel economy, etc, etc.... you'd surely some tangible net-boost in performance.
    Good idea if adding a knock sensor, but as mention above a wide-band lambda logger should be added as well while developing/experimenting.
    Keep up the good work!
    1. The only thing the manufacturer's goal is in this case is being able to put crap fuel in and not damaging the engine, because it has no knock control. You trade that for extra power, as simple as that.
    2. I plan to put detcans on this thing and listen to it, but it is highly unlikely there is any knock... It's a NA engine made for bad gas. Finding actual MBT will require an engine dyno, and of course knock monitoring. There is no point to go nuts on the timing on the water.
    3. WBO2 is a bitch to add and will give absolutely nothing. It probably runs somewhere between 11 and 13 afr at WOT, all you really care about is what the engine likes, and if you don't have prior experience and know what this particular engine/head configuration likes, then knowing numbers changes nothing. If you do however, and are tuning the same engine on a different ECU for example, then it's of great help.
    We're not talking huge modifications here, but rather modifying a stock ski with the stock mapping.

    There is an engine dyno nearby that might get operational by the end of the year, so maybe I'll get around to actually putting it on there and mapping it to MBT/knock limit on 98 RON.

  4. #14
    LindenPWC's Avatar
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    can you investigate the Ultra 310 maps? looking to raise RPM and maybe timing adjustments.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by LindenPWC View Post
    can you investigate the Ultra 310 maps? looking to raise RPM and maybe timing adjustments.
    I don't have the stock file. If someone reads it out, I probably could.

    I held my ski WOT today for over 20 minutes straight - traveling on the sea. Everything is still in one piece

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  7. #16
    Take the time to smile sirbreaksalot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LindenPWC View Post
    can you investigate the Ultra 310 maps? looking to raise RPM and maybe timing adjustments.
    there already a few RELIABLE tried and tested tunes for the 310 ......... what rpm do you want too raise .... your not on the limiter now !!

  8. #17
    LindenPWC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirbreaksalot View Post
    there already a few RELIABLE tried and tested tunes for the 310 ......... what rpm do you want too raise .... your not on the limiter now !!
    8200 RPM

  9. #18
    TBH, I think pretty much any time you "need to" raise the RPM limiter, what you actually want is change/modify the impeller (unless it's a speed limiter).
    The engine has a power curve and revving it over that is utterly pointless.
    The stock Ultra LX fueling map illustrates this very well - the engine breathes best at 7400 rpm and then falls off quite sharply after that.


    Revving it past 8k is going to be pretty pointless, as it won't really make more hp. So you want to modify the impeller so that you're between 7.5-8k at all times, as that will always translate to a higher top speed than revving to 8.5k or more.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  10. #19
    Disassembled the ECU with IDA Pro. The processor core is a SH7052 variant.

    There seems to be a MAP sensor right after the throttle. The fuel maps that use the MAP sensor actually go from vacuum to something like 0.8 or 1 bar boost stock (need to verify what the factor is). Everything after 1000mbar absolute is flatlined in some maps (NA ski can't have boost).
    So this means that the ECU will natively be happy with a supercharger on it - I guess the Ultra 300x uses the same exact ECU and sensor setup.
    Last edited by prj; 06-10-2019 at 01:38 PM.

  11. #20
    My name is Sean and I am addicted to STXs smokeysevin's Avatar
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    All kawasaki 4 stroke skis since the 12f was introduced use a map sensor and tps sensor. I would be interested to compare the 15f map to the ultra lx map. Its the same engine with some minor differences for gauges and security.

    Sean

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