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  1. #1

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    resealing the FX SVHO intake grate????

    I really feel extremely stupid for posting this question. I can wire/plumb an automatic air shifter, install a 12" over swing arm, lower the darn motorcycle etc... but working with caulk and silicone is a whole new concept and has me baffled.

    I took off the intake grate to install the R&D stuffer kit and my only thoughts are this sure seems like a $74 waste of money. I would actually like to see the how the service manual says to reseal the grate because as far as I can tell Yamaha only applied sealant to the 6 bolt holes. It is some tough sealant too as red is coming off with the leftover in the holes.

    If we take a look at Works instructions how in the heck do you clean up the excess that would have to seep into the shoe area since there is no way to get your hand in there? Is that really necessary to do since none of those areas was sealed from the factory?

    With the stock Yamaha seal between the grate and ride plate are the 4 big stuffer plugs really necessary?

    Should I notch the R&D plugs so the stock seal will fit in too or just cut off the blocks of the factory seal?

    Does it matter that the R&D plugs don't go all the way to the rear of the factory grate? Should you use sealant to make them flush?

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  2. #2
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    The sealant around the bolt holes for the intake grate is mostly to keep water from seeping up around the bolts and into the hull. No need for excessive sealant, a small donut of sealant is plenty.

    Some guys like to create a fillet of sealant around the exposed edges of the grate where it contacts the hull so water flows nicely with potentially less turbulence.

    The more important ‘sealing’ for the intake grate is at the back vertical surface, where the intake grate mates to the transom plate. The stock rubber seal with ‘fingers’ is there to seal the bottom edge of the ride plate to the bottom rear of the intake grate. And to seal the ride plate front edge outer areas to the hull.

    In the factory configuration these rubber fingers that sit inside the grate hollows are supposed to somehow also resist the suction from the water flow going over the intake grate and into the jet pump.

    When accelerating hard from low speed the impeller creates a strong suction forward of the impeller. Not only is there air trapped inside the hollow cavities of the intake grate, the rubber seal and fingers have water pressure from below and suction from above. The result is often that the stock rubber seal does not seal as well as might be desired.

    The trapped air also causes a problem. When air is drawn into the jet pump it reduces thrust. The bubbles ‘ventilate’ the water flow. Eliminating the trapped air can improve rough water hook up and acceleration.

    The aftermarket rubber blocks fill up the ‘air space’ inside the intake grate hollow areas. They also provide a much wider surface to apply sealant so the curved upper rear lip of the grate can be fully sealed against the transom plate, using an appropriate sealant.

    The factory rubber finger strip works much better when the fingers are held in place by the rubber blocks. It is easier to get a consistent seal.

  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    I will mention that now might be a good time to remove the transom plate, remove the factory sealant, and re-seal the transom plate to the hull. The factory sealant seems to not be 100% effective and it is common for owners to report water slowly accumulating inside the hull while they ride. Typically this is only a few cups or couple of quarts of water after a day on the water, but it can be annoying.

    While I had my own transom plate removed (GP1800) I sent it to Dean’s to be ‘tapered’. The stock transom plate has a 155mm diameter hole, which matches the hull tunnel. But the SVHO jet pump itself is actually 160mm. The result is a 2.5mm lip all the way around, right in front of the impeller. This can cause water flow turbulence and induce impeller cavitation, especially during hard acceleration.

    Dean bores the 155mm plate out to 160mm to perfectly flow into the jet pump impeller, and includes a taper down to 155 to still match the hull tunnel. The modified transom plate bolts right back where it came from. The install and fit are exactly the same but now there is no lip where it mates to the pump. I used 3M 4200 Fast Cure sealant to rebond the plate to the hull.

    I also filled the hollow cavities on the forward face of the transom plate with epoxy. Eliminates those air pockets and also provides a wider surface for the new sealant to bond the plate to the hull, especially around the curved pump tunnel.

    My perspective is that I want the joint where the transom plate meets the curved hull and the curved intake grate edges, to be 100% sealed all the way around the circle. No sealant gaps, no air leaks, and smooth water flow.

    I have posted photos and more tips in another thread.

  4. #4

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    Thank you, I greatly appreciate the effort you put into your reply. I will probably reread this a few times. Was already thinking about the deans bore, probably Jim's ride plate too and get it all out of the way.

  5. #5
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    This thread has more info and some photos.

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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post

    I also filled the hollow cavities on the forward face of the transom plate with epoxy. Eliminates those air pockets and also provides a wider surface for the new sealant to bond the plate to the hull, especially around the curved pump tunnel.

    My perspective is that I want the joint where the transom plate meets the curved hull and the curved intake grate edges, to be 100% sealed all the way around the circle. No sealant gaps, no air leaks, and smooth water flow.
    Im looking at doing a full build on my new gp (plates and epoxy for the grate mount reinforcement and sealing the transom after tis been tapered), and looking into epoxy. I'm not familiar with it and looking for input. People say to use the west 105 but a buddy of mine used the 610 which is applied like caulk. Or you could just fill the transom with 4200/5200? Are the resin kits to do tables the same as the west 105? Thanks for any answers you can give me and a push in the right direction or link to product.

  7. #7
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    I used the West System epoxy. You would want something that pours in as a liquid and does not trap air.

    I suspect that 4200 or 5200 would not properly cure in a deep cavity. The top surface might cure up but deep down it would still be goey for a long time.


  8. #8

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    I am asking another stupid question because I really don't understand these sealers or sealing in general. I am guessing to make the seal its most effective the plugs should be flush with the back of the grate which these R&D plugs are definitely not. Can I just put the 4200 or 5200 behind the plug and let it set up to hold the plug flush or do something else?

    Oh, and the question that has me wondering if I picked up the wrong new hobby. Is it possible to put the grate back on without removing the ride plate? If not hiw the heck am I going to remove the ride plate with it sitting on the trailer? WTF did I buy the seal kit for????

    Thanks again

  9. #9
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Is the rubber block actually too small or just not positioned correctly in the hollow space? The grate cavity is tapered, and the block must rest against the 'upper' slope. Turn the grate upside down and retest the fit.

    No problem working on the intake grate with the ride plate in place.

    Tip: If you do want/need to remove the ride plate, here is how.

    Connect trailer to car hitch. Latch coupler. Loosen winch strap a few turns, latch winch. Slide hull backwards on the trailer bunks until the ride plate is just clear of the bunk ends. Tighten winch strap to remove any remaining slack.

    Now you can remove the ride plate.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by K447 View Post
    Is the rubber block actually too small or just not positioned correctly in the hollow space? The grate cavity is tapered, and the block must rest against the 'upper' slope. Turn the grate upside down and retest the fit.

    No problem working on the intake grate with the ride plate in place.

    Tip: If you do want/need to remove the ride plate, here is how.

    Connect trailer to car hitch. Latch coupler. Loosen winch strap a few turns, latch winch. Slide hull backwards on the trailer bunks until the ride plate is just clear of the bunk ends. Tighten winch strap to remove any remaining slack.

    Now you can remove the ride plate.

    all 4 of the big rubber blocks are too small (actually too short) by 3/16" They fit the cavities perfectly when pushed all the way in but are loose if I want to position them all the way to the rear, hence the question about taking up that extra space with sealant. I think one of the pics I posted on the initial post shows all the blocks sitting pushed in without any notches cut and they are all too short.

    Thanks for the tip on moving the ski back on the trailer. I have tried and tried getting the grate back on to test fit the notch in the rubber but can't get it to slide on.

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