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  1. #21
    steve45's Avatar
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    You can use starter fluid, but it's not recommended. For sure don't make a habit of it as it burns hot and offers no lubrication to the cylinders. You can use a teaspoon of gasoline, or better yet, pre-mixed gasoline.

    The loose oil line will cause air to get into the lube system, but not enough to make it run lean. Lack of oil is essentially a little bit lean.

    As far as water hurting anything, you might loosen the screws on the front cover and pry on it just a little to see if any water comes out the bottom. There is a large O-ring that is a pain to put back on, so it's better not to disturb it if you can avoid it. The starter is the other potential problem area. If water gets in there, it will rust up. The starter has two mounting bolts and associated wires. There is an O-ring seal on the starter, but it's not designed to hold up long under water.

    Yes, your 'Ski has fuel filters. It has a ridiculous number of them, in fact. There is one on each pickup inside the tank (On and Reserve), there should be an inline filter, and each carb has an internal screen. That's FIVE fuel filters! When I had the 750s and 1100s, I took the filters off the fuel tank pickups and installed rubber fuel hoses of the same length as the filters. I don't think I've seen an in-tank filter plug up, but I've seen them crumble into pieces. If you don't have an inline filter, get a real JetSki filter, not an auto parts store version. The correct type is clear so you can see through it, it has a very fine mesh screen that won't pass water, and you can remove it and backflush the filter element.

    I actually installed the old-style SeaDoo filters on my 'Skis. They had a twist-off canister that allowed you to easily remove the filter element and clean it, then re-install it.


  2. #22
    Looks like I have a fuel delivery issue. Poured fuel into the carb and the engine started right up.

    What's the best way for me to test this? Can I just pull the fuel return line off the first carb and see if there is fuel?

    Can I turn the engine over and see if there is fuel pumping out the line?

  3. #23
    steve45's Avatar
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    Start with checking the pulse line from the fuel pump to the crankcase port. Sometimes they split and the pump won't operate. After that, look at the fuel filters. After that, pull the carbs off and take a look inside. I would do this before pulling the filters from inside the fuel tank.

  4. #24
    Am I just checking the line has no issues? So just pull it off and give it a blow to check for leaks?

    What is the best way to test the pump? Can I try link the fuel in on the cab directly to a can of gas and crank the engine? To eliminate the issue being on the supply side (tank, fuel lines, fuel switch).

    I am a little confused, you say to check the filters then pull the carb before checking the filters.

    Do you mean I must pull the carb, then check the filters in the tanks.

    OR

    Check the non-tanks filters(which filters??), then the carb, then the fuel tank filters

  5. #25
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    There are three different filters in the fuel system. The first being the strainer at the end of the pickup tube in the fuel tank. The second being the in-line filter in the hull. The third being a fine mesh screen that is pressed inside the carb body (disassembly required).

  6. #26
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    First check the inline filter--if you have one. You mentioned that you didn't see one. Next, pull the carbs and look inside at those screens. Pull the screens from inside the tank last, as those are least like to get plugged and are the hardest to get to.

    You can run a hose from the fuel pump output to a can and start the engine briefly by priming it with gasoline. It should pump very quickly. Fuel pumps don't fail all that often.

    Keep in mind that probably 75% or more of all fuel issues are due to ethanol in the gasoline and poor storage preparation. Ethanol absorbs moisture, which condenses and plugs up filters and carbs. It also causes corrosion. Sta-Bil and other fuel treatments reduce the problem somewhat, as does keeping the tank full during storage to prevent condensation.

  7. #27
    The plot thickens....

    So I decided to ignore all your great advice and just stick the fuel input line into a jar of pre-mixed fuel. This got the engine started pretty easily and the engine ran until I turn the hose on then the engine died.

    I also noticed some water flowing into the bilge after running the engine on the hose.

    Lastly, after running the engine I wanted to check the plugs to see the condition. And when I pluued the plug the boot came off the wire.

    So I know I need to walk through the fuel delivery to find the problem. I have ordered new gas lines and will replace these, check and replace the filters and probably replace the gas. Can the tank be removed through the front hatch?

    I probably still rebuild the carb.


    I am considering just pulling the engine this week and setting up a station for the winter to rebuild it.

    Any thoughts why the engine cuts when I run a hose water? Do you think the water in the hull (after running the hose) is an issue?

    I tried to pull the pulse line but the crankcase side is very difficult to get at. I'll need to pull the carb off tomorrow to access it.

  8. #28
    steve45's Avatar
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    No problem with running with gas in a jar.

    First things first, however. Did you turn the water off IMMEDIATELY after the engine quit? If not, it's possible for water to back flow into the engine and cause major damage. If you don't know, pull the spark plugs, ground the wires, and crank the engine with the starter. If water shoots out, continue cranking until it clears.

    The spark plug boots simply screw onto the end of the wire. While it's off, try pulling the wire strands with some needlenose pliers to see if any are broken. This is common. If the strands are broken, cut the wire back 1/2" or so to find better wire. If you cut too much, you'll have to replace the wire or it won't reach the spark plug.

    Engine has to come out to pull the tank. I've cleaned a couple of fuel tanks by feeding small towels through the tank opening, when twisting them to 'swish' them around. This is after the fuel has been siphoned out. Don't go through the filler cap, remove the filler hose and go straight into the tank. How old is the gas?

    Don't destroy the pulse hose to inspect it. If it's split, you'll probably see it.

    I don't think running water has anything to do with the engine quitting. I suspect it's just not getting enough fuel.

    Water in the hull is a problem. Is it leaking from the cheesy flush hose fitting?

  9. #29
    One the water, I tried to do this, unfortunately my dad turned the tap he wrong way, he doesn't live in the US and claimed the taps turn the other way. I am not so sure but he generally knows his stuff. I was smart enough to add a quick connect to the engine so when I heard the water was still on I pulled the hose. Hose ran for around 15 seconds before I pulled it. I did check for water in the cylinders and there was not a significant amount (although like before the plugs still look a little wet when I check them, I'll try post a picture).

    Hose fitting seemed pretty tight and wasn't leaking. I'll need to get the engine running a little more consistently before I can figure out where the water is coming from.

    Gas is a month old. Previous Owner cleared it out last month. So I may do a little more testing before pulling the tank. The supply line seems clear enough (I can blow air through it fairly easily). I am going to do a little more testing on the gas issue to see if the problem is bad gas. I'll try run a line directly from the tank. Right now my theory is that either the pump in't strong enough to pull the gas from the tank but can pull from the jar(from either blockage or just distance) or the gas is bad. I think I'll try run the tank gas from the Jar to eliminate that issue and test flow on the return line to see if the gas is getting through.

    Pulse line seems fine but the connection at the carb wasn't zipped tied on too tight and I was able to pull it off easily, not sure if that would affect the effectiveness but I have new zip ties to tighten that up.

    I only get about 20 minutes each day after work of good light and before the neighbors put their kids to bed to test run the engine. This weekend I will have a lot more time to work through the issues systematically. I think the good news is the engine runs just fine when it is getting gas. So I may even be able to take the ski for a ride before it gets too cold. I just wanted to thank those (particularly Steve45) here for all the help this week. Your advice has been invaluable. As much as I can read about how these things work in theory some practical advise make such a difference. Hard to believe that this time last week I know almost nothing about Jet Skis or 2 stroke engines.

    I'll keep you posted as I work though things this weekend.

  10. #30
    steve45's Avatar
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    I don't think you need to pull the tank.

    Did you determine whether it has an inline fuel filter or not?

    What does the gas in the tank smell like? Bad gas smells different, like turpentine or something.

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