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  1. #1
    freedom04's Avatar
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    Driveshaft getting hot

    hey guys, i had a through hull bearing seize up on me a couple weeks ago, so after having to cut the through hull bearing off the driveshaft, i noticed the driveshaft itself was gone, too many grooves and too worn out. i went ahead and ordered a new one, and a new through hull bearing, it IS in fact the ''bearing'' type. i noticed however after installing, the driveshaft gets pretty hot to the touch, not sizzling hot but enough to where u can almost not touch it. i can leave my finger on it a second or maybe two but not much more than that. the coupler is warm too but not as hot as the actual driveshaft.

    Any ideas what this can be from? maybe because the shaft is new maybe has to break in from the added friction?

    the through hull bearing is also pretty warm but is grease FULLY.

  2. #2

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    Is that in the water or running on the hose?

    Sent from my SM-G930F using GreenHulk PWC Performance mobile app powered by Tapatalk

  3. #3
    freedom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bop View Post
    Is that in the water or running on the hose?

    Sent from my SM-G930F using GreenHulk PWC Performance mobile app powered by Tapatalk
    it is in the water

  4. #4

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    Mmmmm. I run have run the same bearing for two years and have not felt the running temp, but also did not have one seize. I did destroy the bearing by running too long on the hose (rookie mistake) it is still 55 degrees Fahrenheit here so a comparison is not going to happen. Maybe a northern hemisphere member can help.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using GreenHulk PWC Performance mobile app powered by Tapatalk

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  6. #5
    martincom's Avatar
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    I'd speculate you have something binding. With the sparkplugs out, you should be able to grasp the driveshaft coupler and turn it over by hand. If not, something is binding such as bent driveshaft, engine/driveshaft not aligned, new bearings failing (probably are bad now if the driveshaft got this hot) to name the places I'd start checking.

    Also, pull the pump off and see if you can turn it over by hand. If you couldn't before and can now....you know where to look.

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  8. #6
    freedom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martincom View Post
    I'd speculate you have something binding. With the sparkplugs out, you should be able to grasp the driveshaft coupler and turn it over by hand.
    yea that's the first thing i did, and everything moves freely and evenly that's why i can't understand why it's getting so hot. weird.

  9. #7
    madtom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freedom04 View Post
    yea that's the first thing i did, and everything moves freely and evenly that's why i can't understand why it's getting so hot. weird.
    were you able to determine why it was getting warm? I just replaced the fitting in my ski and same thing. thinking probably that i let the rtv setup for too long before dropping the engine in.... that may created just enough pressure on one side that the bearing is under a directional load vs being centered.

  10. #8
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madtom View Post
    ... I just replaced the fitting in my ski and same thing. thinking probably that i let the rtv setup for too long before dropping the engine in.... that may created just enough pressure on one side that the bearing is under a directional load vs being centered.
    What year/model is this? Where is the RTV sealant being applied?


  11. #9
    madtom's Avatar
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    2003 12f. I pulled the engine and put a new thru hull bearing in. i apparently left it on the hose for too long. 45 minutes to cook the rest of the moisture out of the oil system. I had a defective oil-cooler that was clogged and was letting water get into the oil, so i had to repair and replace... when it is in the water water cools the driveshaft and this provides cooling for the bearings. I had a good bead of sealant in-between the bearing retainer and the aluminum shaft fitting that attaches to the hose clamp. Some of the RTV got into a bolt hole and hardened on one side. cleaned it all out today and put a new bearing and seals in. I use the RTV grey and only smeared around the back oring on the bearing carrier.

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