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  1. #1
    steve45's Avatar
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    Replacing The 900/1100 Oil Pump Drive Coupling Bearings

    The lubrication systems on the 2-strokes are pretty reliable IF you upgrade the oil lines and secure them properly. However, I've found that the drive coupling bearings on the 900/1100 engines seem to fail way too often. I found a bad bearing on an engine that I replaced the bearings on about 4 years/50 hours ago.

    Kawasaki doesn't sell the bearings separately, they want to sell you a complete assembly for $138! The coupling takes two common bearings, # 6901 2RS. You can find them for less than $10 each. Replacing them is easy, but there are a couple of things to know before you start. I would also recommend replacing the O-rings on the plate under the oil pump on the stator cover. One of them doesn't look like an O-ring, it's an odd shape and you'll have to buy it from Kawasaki. O-ring part numbers are 92055-1284, and 92055-3729. I usually don't replace the large O-ring where the stator cover attaches to the crankcase.

    When you remove the oil pump from the front cover, this is what you'll see:


    When you remove the stator cover, you'll find the coupling inside. It has drive tangs that engage the oil pump shaft and the flywheel bolt. Yamaha uses a rubber coupling that seems to last forever, but we're stuck with what Kawasaki gave us. You'll notice that the coupling is secured by a lock ring:



    Remove the lock ring, then flip the stator cover over and gently drive the coupling out with a brass drift:


    Here's what the coupling assembly looks like after you remove it:


    Notice the rubber insert in the coupling housing
    . This acts as a damper for the bearings. You will have to press the bearings out. Be sure you don't damage the rubber insert!
    Remove the small lock ring on the shaft. Find a deep socket that is just large enough to slip over the inboard end of the shaft, then use a vise to press the shaft out of the bearings. (Sorry, I forgot to take a picture of that operation).

    Here is what you'll get:


    Now you'll have to press the bearings out of the housing. I used two sockets; one that fits the inner sleeve of the housing, and one that fits the bearing. You will assemble the sockets and coupling into your vise and press the bearings into the larger socket. Make sure it's large enough for the bearings to slide into:


    Here's what it looks like completely disassembled:


    Press the bearings into the coupling housing, one on each side. The surfaces are all flush, so you really don't need to use a socket for this. (No photo for this, just stick the parts in the vise and squeeze).

    Next, press the shaft back into the bearings. You don't want to side-load the bearings or the rubber insert in the housing. Use a socket that will just slide over the shaft and push against the inner bearing race and press it together with your vise:

    Put the small lock ring on the shaft.

    Time to insert the coupling back into the stator cover. It might take a little force to push it in, so use a large socket that will push against the outside of the coupling:


    The main thing to remember is that you never want to apply a side load to the bearings or the rubber insert in the coupling housing. Install the large lock ring to secure the coupling in the stator housing and you're finished with this part of the procedure.

    You'll also have to remove the oil pump mounting place, clean out any debris and check that the cooling lines are clear, replace the O-rings, reassemble the oil pump mounting plate, and install the stator cover assembly back on the engine.
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  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    The lubrication systems on the 2-strokes are pretty reliable IF you upgrade the oil lines and secure them properly. However, I've found that the drive coupling bearings on the 900/1100 engines seem to fail way too often. I found a bad bearing on an engine that I replaced the bearings on about 4 years/50 hours ago.

    Kawasaki doesn't sell the bearings separately, they want to sell you a complete assembly for $138! The coupling takes two common bearings, # 6901 2RS. You can find them for less than $10 each. Replacing them is easy, but there are a couple of things to know before you start. I would also recommend replacing the O-rings on the plate under the oil pump on the stator cover. One of them doesn't look like an O-ring, it's an odd shape and you'll have to buy it from Kawasaki. O-ring part numbers are 92055-1284, and 92055-3729. I usually don't replace the large O-ring where the stator cover attaches to the crankcase.

    When you remove the oil pump from the front cover, this is what you'll see:


    When you remove the stator cover, you'll find the coupling inside. It has drive tangs that engage the oil pump shaft and the flywheel bolt. Yamaha uses a rubber coupling that seems to last forever, but we're stuck with what Kawasaki gave us. You'll notice that the coupling is secured by a lock ring:



    Remove the lock ring, then flip the stator cover over and gently drive the coupling out with a brass drift:


    Here's what the coupling assembly looks like after you remove it:


    Notice the rubber insert in the coupling housing
    . This acts as a damper for the bearings. You will have to press the bearings out. Be sure you don't damage the rubber insert!
    Remove the small lock ring on the shaft. Find a deep socket that is just large enough to slip over the inboard end of the shaft, then use a vise to press the shaft out of the bearings. (Sorry, I forgot to take a picture of that operation).

    Here is what you'll get:


    Now you'll have to press the bearings out of the housing. I used two sockets; one that fits the inner sleeve of the housing, and one that fits the bearing. You will assemble the sockets and coupling into your vise and press the bearings into the larger socket. Make sure it's large enough for the bearings to slide into:


    Here's what it looks like completely disassembled:


    Press the bearings into the coupling housing, one on each side. The surfaces are all flush, so you really don't need to use a socket for this. (No photo for this, just stick the parts in the vise and squeeze).

    Next, press the shaft back into the bearings. You don't want to side-load the bearings or the rubber insert in the housing. Use a socket that will just slide over the shaft and push against the inner bearing race and press it together with your vise:

    Put the small lock ring on the shaft.

    Time to insert the coupling back into the stator cover. It might take a little force to push it in, so use a large socket that will push against the outside of the coupling:


    The main thing to remember is that you never want to apply a side load to the bearings or the rubber insert in the coupling housing. Install the large lock ring to secure the coupling in the stator housing and you're finished with this part of the procedure.

    You'll also have to remove the oil pump mounting place, clean out any debris and check that the cooling lines are clear, replace the O-rings, reassemble the oil pump mounting plate, and install the stator cover assembly back on the engine.
    Awesome how-to instructions! Thank you!

  3. #3
    yes....thanks alot for the detailed how-to

  4. #4
    Myself's Avatar
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    Yes, thanks for taking the time to contribute.

    this should be stickied

  5. #5
    I've got a 900 triple the oil tank was removed and I have to mix the fuel and oil. I've still got these two barbed fittings on the front of this cover. Is this going to damage the motor by running this without any oil in this pump?

  6. #6
    steve45's Avatar
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    No.

  7. #7
    Myself's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesunscreen View Post
    I've got a 900 triple the oil tank was removed and I have to mix the fuel and oil. I've still got these two barbed fittings on the front of this cover. Is this going to damage the motor by running this without any oil in this pump?
    Those fittings are cooling lines, it helps keep the stator from burning up.

  8. #8

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    An easy way to install bearings is to place the bearing in the freezer for 1 hour, then use a hair dryer to heat the bearing area on the cover. You'll be surprised. I've had them drop right in.

  9. #9
    steve45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myself View Post
    Those fittings are cooling lines, it helps keep the stator from burning up.
    Yes, they are cooling lines. I am assuming that the hoses are still hooked up. Removing the oil pump will not affect them.

    I don't know if the cooling lines are needed for the stator, or if they're really for the 1100 DI electronics. I suspect the front cover was designed to be standard across the 900/1100 lines. The 750s and the 1200s don't use water cooling for the stator.

    On a number of occasions I've recommended that people check that the hoses are clear, but I don't really know if they are necessary. If anyone knows for sure (Peter?), please let us know!

  10. #10

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    I always thought the cooling lines are for the bearing behind the oil pump, not the stator.

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