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Thread: Electric Gti ..

  1. #1
    SLASHER's Avatar
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    Electric Gti ..

    Here's a link of a Seadoo Gti stripped and converted to a electric Gti ..

    I saw it leaving a local dealer and coming back complete .. Built by UWA university Australia ..

    page 34 pic of ski and the rest tech talk ..



    :http://robotics.ee.uwa.edu.au/theses...-Madappuli.pdf


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    steven mace's Avatar
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    would love to see it go

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    SLASHER's Avatar
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    I bet I will pull harder than a SC ski ..

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    boost junkie skidoochris's Avatar
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    what a waist of time and money...

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    it is clearly a project for school. isnt a waste at all..

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    ride it like you stole it!!! raceneked's Avatar
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    ...can you imagine the torque that thing can muster.., then theres potential prop/impeller speed... hooooooo; how much fun could this be, once developed??!!!

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    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLASHER View Post
    Range: TBD
    Top Speed: TBA
    Curb Weight TBA
    Needs some empirical test results.

    Range and weight are always the big questions with this sort of thing.

    And how much the range is affected as speed is increased.

    Range is a bigger deal with an electric machine as refueling cannot happen except at prepared locations or with mobile generator equipment. The battery must hold enough charge to not only take you round trip, but also have enough reserve capacity for unexpected events.

    In the gasoline world the rule of thumb for powerboat travel (especially on open water) is one third tank to get you there, one third tank to get back home and one third tank for reserve.

    Reading the paper from the first link, sustained cruise power will be something less than 30hp (electric energy equivalent) into the electric motor, and even less into the jet pump. Something just under 100hp burst for two minutes maximum.

    Weight of the electric drive system including batteries is circa 600 pounds. Is that more than an installed 4-Tec engine, exhaust, cooling, etc plus full gas tank?
    Last edited by K447; 08-08-2015 at 12:49 PM.

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    SLASHER's Avatar
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    I heard that at full power 1 hr and cruising at 5/6000rpm 2hrs ..

  12. #10
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLASHER View Post
    I heard that at full power 1 hr and cruising at 5/6000rpm 2hrs ..
    I have not read all the documentation but what I did read indicated that the electric system could deliver maximum power for only two minutes. No way to run at that power level for a full hour. Electric power trains are very different from internal combustion systems, including what factors limit the sustained power levels.

    Imagine you had a gasoline engine with severely limited engine cooling capacity. You can run continuously at medium power but push it any harder and it begins to overheat. The harder you push it the fewer seconds you have before the engine computer cuts the RPM to prevent damage. That is what electric drive systems are like. You can have lots of power for very short bursts or plenty of time at rather modest power levels.

    Unlike a gasoline engine, RPM is somewhat arbitrary in an electric drive. Higher RPM is not necessarily more powerful, it is simply higher RPM. The peak RPM in this system was presumably chosen to match the power characteristics of the selected electric motor and the power controller module. One catch is that a jet pump sized for best propulsion efficiency at 30hp (which seems to be the sustained cruise maximum) is going to be undersized when the electric motor output bursts to the 100hp level.

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