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  1. #1
    800AMSOIL4U's Avatar
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    Magnet for the Yamaha Oil Filter

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Name:	filtermag on yamaha filter.jpg 
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Name:	filter mag for yamaha filter.jpg 
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    Here is a great little product from FilterMag. It is a super strong reusable magnet that goes on the outside of the oil filter to catch metal particles. http://filtermag.com/ The SS-250 fits the Yamaha.


  2. #2
    800AMSOIL4U's Avatar
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  3. #3
    Isn't this a somewhat useless product for a modern Japanese ALL ALUMINUM motor with very little ferrous material in it? What's that magnet going to catch that a good OEM filter and regular oil changes wouldn't already??
    Last edited by Raptor; 07-24-2015 at 12:53 PM.

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  5. #4
    Ericruiz911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor View Post
    Isn't this a somewhat useless product for a modern Japanese ALL ALUMINUM motor with very little ferrous material in it? What's that magnet going to catch that a good OEM filter and regular oil changes wouldn't already??
    Block is aluminum while connecting rods and pistons are steel

  6. #5
    ptscon's Avatar
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    If your pistons or connecting rod is shedding metal you probably have issues.

  7. #6
    powerstroke specialist mikegp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptscon View Post
    If your pistons or connecting rod is shedding metal you probably have issues.
    you not only got pistons and connecting rods , you also have gears and timing chain, sprag clutch bearings and so , these parts in fact do as they wear generate fine metal shavings that incredible travel through the whole engine , in my experience as a transmission rebuilder have seen magnets that actually comes from factory on the bottom of the pan collect most of the metal shavings . with out these that same transmission would have had a premature failure.
    the same apply to any engine if you can keep that loose metal at the filter it will prolong the engine life for sure, i will used w/o a doubt .

  8. #7
    Ok I get your point..... but we are not taking about placing a magnet in the bottom of a automobile tranny pan, completely different machine, it's a Waverunner with an all aluminum motor! BTW all Yamaha motors run ALUMINUM forged pistons something you don't seem to be aware of!

    Placing a magnet on the filter isn't really giving you, or anyone else any extra protection. Use OEM filters and change your oil regularly..... NO magnet required!

    Those fine metal ferrous shavings your potentially worried about once they make it into the filter DON'T NEED A MAGNET TO KEEP THEM THERE!!!
    Last edited by Raptor; 07-26-2015 at 10:28 AM.

  9. #8
    powerstroke specialist mikegp's Avatar
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    below is a long post , you need to make some time and read all , you will understand what a oil filter is by the time you finished .
    it's a filter element not a reverse osmosis membrane . lol .

    BTW thanks for the heads up , i will be buying and using one for sure , have been using a home made one on my racing 6.0 powerstroke stang .
    Last edited by mikegp; 07-24-2015 at 07:24 PM.

  10. #9
    powerstroke specialist mikegp's Avatar
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    Here’s a surprise: the filtering media does not actually filter. Yup, that’s right. The filtering media does not actually filter. Remember the oil bath air cleaners of the ’40s and ’50s? If you’re old enough to remember them, you may or may not be aware that they worked by forcing incoming air to follow an “S”-shaped route past a trough of engine oil. The concept was, the air could easily follow the turns, while the heavier particles of dirt and debris couldn’t make the turn, and momentum would carry the grit straight into the oil, where it was held hostage until someone dumped the dirty oil and replenished it. Believe it or not, that’s actually how modern oil filters work. The filtering media does not act like a screen, but rather traps contaminants that cannot change direction easily. Of course, explains Purolator’s Nuñez, today’s oil filter media is very sophisticated, and much science has gone into its design and construction. The design of the media determines how small a particle can be held, and how much capacity the filter has for holding debris. By the way, Nuñez also notes that the configuration of the size, shape, and number of pleats in a given oil filter are actually mathematically calculated to allow for the maximum amount of media to be exposed to the oil flow. So back to particle size and filter capacity. Let’s deal with particle size first. Here’s the short answer: if you can see it, it’s too big, it’ll damage the engine, and it needs to be filtered out.
    OK, OK, here’s the long answer. The term “efficiency” is used in the filtration world to describe the amount or percentage of contaminants that are caught and held as oil passes through the filter. There are SAE standards for “test debris” and for testing procedures. Purolator Classic oil filters are 97.5 percent efficient, and Purolator PureONE filters are 99.9 percent% efficient - the highest efficiency ratings on the market. Both filters will essentially remove their respective percentages of particles 20 microns or larger in diameter -- including virtually all particles large enough to be visible to the naked eye. Picture this: a human hair can measure as little as 30 microns (one micron is a millionths of a meter) in diameter (don’t forget we’re talking an end view here…). A human bacteria can measure 20 microns. And the soot found floating around in cigarette smoke can measure nearly one micron. So a filter that removes virtually all particles 20 microns or larger is offering phenomenal protection to your engine. Here’s more food for thought. A single chip from your rotary broach or milling machine often runs around 0.007”, which translates into about 175 microns. And a stray piece of casting flash is certainly much larger. You can well imagine, and have probably seen, the devastating effects of having a 0.007” piece of debris trying to squeeze itself into the 0.002-0.003” clearance between a rod or main bearing shell and a crankshaft journal. And who among us can claim with certainty that they’ve never left a single, or modest collection of, machining chips hidden away in an engine block or cylinder head? There are two ways to measure filter efficiency – single-pass and multi-pass. Which test do you think better represents real-world oil filtration – a single-pass test that runs just 45 gallons of oil through a test filter, or a multi-pass test that passes more than 2,500 gallons through the filter? Why it’s the multi-pass test of course. But won’t a filter that’s more efficient get clogged sooner, causing the bypass valve (if the filter has one…) to open and direct unfiltered oil to the crankshaft, bearings, and other critical components? Ah, that brings us to what the filter engineers refer to as capacity. Capacity represents the amount of contaminants a filter can remove and hold before flow is restricted. Capacity is usually measured in grams. Some filter makers don’t advertise capacity if it’s not a favorable number for them. In the case of Purolator PureONE oil filters, they have a capacity of at least 13 grams. In real-world terms that means that a PureONE filter will hold the equivalent of 31 standard-size paper clips before it becomes blocked. And that’s a whole lot of debris. Beyond efficiency and capacity, there are other features you should look for in your choice of an oil filter – things like a steel center tube for reliable support of the media, a one-piece anti-drainback valve (less likely to leak than a multi-piece design), and a flat sealing ring, shown by SAE tests to provide greater sealing surface area, higher blowout resistance, and longer life than O-ring or P-ring designs. Purolator oil filters provide all this and more. Some filter companies use paper or felt end caps versus the steel end caps used by Purolator. In cold climates where cold start-ups can cause huge momentary spikes in oil pressure, you should look for a filter design that’s been tested for burst strength. Our Purolator expert tells us that Purolator Classic and PureONE oil filters, for example, are tested 25,000 cycles at pressure pulses of 0-100-0 psi to validate filter housings’ mechanical strength. If you ever wondered about how an oil filter does it’s job, now you know.

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by mikegp View Post
    below is a long post , you need to make some time and read all , you will understand what a oil filter is by the time you finished .
    it's a filter element not a reverse osmosis membrane . lol .

    BTW thanks for the heads up , i will be buying and using one for sure , have been using a home made one on my racing 6.0 powerstroke stang .
    Hey you want to waste money on a virtually useless magnet for your aluminum engine waverunner, feel free......It's your dime.
    I'll change my oil regularly & use only OEM Yamaha filters when I do it, no magnet required.

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