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  1. #1

    Starting to get frustrated, 2002 Virage i

    Put the repaired and updated EMM in, took it to boat ramp, it fired right up, was idling, lots of smoke, probably from all the oil, from past failed starting, idle about a minute, was checking for water and fuel leakage, then advanced the throttle a bit, it died, wouldn't re start,

    put new plugs in it, fresh gas, no start, it acted like it wants to start, then dies,

    could the start/ kill module be problem, or does initial start last Friday, cancel that out?

    I'm whipped on this project!
    Last edited by K447; 06-15-2015 at 09:29 AM.


  2. #2
    This is how I run a jetski shop in the desert nmpeter's Avatar
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    while anything is possible, I would wonder why you replaced the plugs, that ignition can pretty much fire a plug that is soaked in oil.

    Using original equipment plugs?..substitutes often cause problems.

    fuel pump running?

    battery hot?

  3. #3
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    What diagnostics have you done since the no start event?

    Bypass the LR-503 Start/Stop module?

    Unplug the TPS?

    Check fuel pressure?

    Injector voltage correct while cranking? (Both injectors still plugged in)

    Do you have spark?

    Spark plug wires crossed?

    Recheck all connectors.

    Ohm test the CPS sensor and water temp sensor, air temp sensor.

  4. #4
    Plugs are the req'd ngk, haven't bypassed the lr 503 start/stop yet, but will do, will re check everything, fuel press, tps, cps, and such. Air temp and water temp sensors, haven't checked them. I take it, the manual has the info on that check? lol I feel like I'm chasing my tail!

  5. #5
    Ugh, gasket bad on cylinder, water getting in, and upon further review, have a scored piston, so hopefully new piston and rings, cylinder honed, she'll be up and running by this Friday? Should I take it easy on the throttle for a while? Break in required?

  6. #6
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elk river rascal View Post
    Ugh, gasket bad on cylinder, water getting in, and upon further review, have a scored piston,

    so hopefully new piston and rings, cylinder honed, she'll be up and running by this Friday? Should I take it easy on the throttle for a while? Break in required?
    Water getting in where? Enough to cause a no start condition?

    Honed cylinder plus new rings means break in. Verify the cylinder to piston clearances will be within spec after honing.

  7. #7
    Will ask the guy about piston clearance being in spec, so Engine break in, I've heard the saying "break it in" the way you drive it, on anything you ride or drive, but thinking I should lean more to the cautious side, no rapid acceleration, or WOT? Hoping I'm on the water with my ski Friday evening. Appreciate the input this sight gives.

  8. #8
    Click avatar for tech links/info K447's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elk river rascal View Post
    ... Engine break in, I've heard the saying "break it in" the way you drive it, on anything you ride or drive, but thinking I should lean more to the cautious side, no rapid acceleration, or WOT?

    Hoping I'm on the water with my ski Friday evening...
    While you will find differing 'schools of thought' regarding engine break-in, for these watercraft the general consensus is a phased approach.

    It has been posted about previously, but in summary the engine is heat cycled and run, first for a short time period at modest RPM, followed by cool down, then a moderately longer run with varying RPM, no wide open yet. Cool down. After a few more cycles you will be bursting to max RPM for a few seconds followed by much longer periods of frequently varying throttle, then another wide open burst, and so on, mostly running below 2/3 throttle. By the time you have worked through a full fuel tank and a number of heat cycles with incrementally greater range of throttle and frequent changes of throttle and more frequent and longer wide open bursts, the engine is considered broken in.

    During early break in the extra friction from the fresh piston rings against the freshly honed cylinder walls is moderated by keeping the engine RPM and power levels in check. As the rings bed in they require more throttle to force the rings harder against the cylinder walls, with extra friction heat still occurring. Eventually you are doing frequent bursts to wide open and the rings will have worn into the cylinder honing as much as they can.

    All this can be done in a few hours at the lake, including several cool down intervals.

    While the engine is cooling down between cycles, checking compression can be useful to confirm nothing bad is happening. It will take a few break-in cycles for the compression numbers to become consistent, so don't get too worried about the exact numbers.

    Here is an engine break-in post I found online a few years ago. I presume it dates from the era of carburetor engines;
    http://web.archive.org/web/200212010...ww.pwcamr.com/

    The motor on your personal watercraft is a high-performance engine. Unlike a car, these motors are run at their highest RPM for long periods of time. After all, when was the last time you ran your car's engine at 6000+ RPM for several minutes straight? PWC motors require more care to keep them running at peak efficiency.
    Break-in MUST be done as the first thing when you buy your watercraft! If you've already ridden your watercraft for a couple hours, it's too late to do a proper break-in. All the same, if it's too late for your watercraft, read this anyway as a reference for when you buy your next watercraft!

    The following break-in procedure was an article at the Personal Watercraft After Market Reviews website.


    The Time To Break In by Kurt Knollenberg

    OK, you have just put out over $x thousand dollars for this years boat of your dreams and can't wait to go out and prove to all your buddies that you have indeed purchased "the baddest mother on the lake."

    STOP!!!!!! Hold on there cowboy! Would you like your new wondercraft to perform at its top level? Would you like it to do so for an extended period of time?? Proper break-in procedures will help you achieve these goals.

    A few years ago I was lucky enough to spend some time with one of the test riders for a certain leading watercraft manufacturer. While at dinner one night after a day of testing and racing at the World Finals we got into a heated discussion of what makes one stock boat run so much better and more trouble free than an identical model. One of his statements to me was that proper break-in could make a world of difference! His company had paid eight test riders to go out and break-in numerous identical craft, they did this for eight hours a day for several weeks. Some of their findings regarding performance were very enlightening and I thought I would share them with you now.

    Initial set up:
    Your machine was put together on an assembly line by competent workers who are human, but it is always a good idea to go over your new craft and look for obvious errors (oil lines loose? Engine mount bolts tight?) before you hit the water for the first time.

    Tools for a proper break-in session:
    Owners manual, spark plug wrench, extra spark plugs (# of cylinders times two), a comfortable chair and a good long book.

    Break-In:
    One of the most important aspects of proper break-in is cooling off time, after each of the steps be sure to let your craft cool all the way down till you can feel that the motor has returned to ambient temperature. This cooling off period allows all the new parts that are wearing in together a time to contract to their "natural" state. By doing this, your engines' separate components are allowed to mesh gradually rather than being forced into complying with all the stresses of their new environment (sounds like moving a pet into a new house ?!). Many top engine builders prefer this gradual process.

    Stage one:
    Back your trailer into the water somewhere that you can leave it for twenty or thirty minutes without obstructing others from water access. In other words do not do this at your local boat ramp! Do not be a "Ramp Retard"! With your craft securely tied to the trailer and the pump firmly in the water and well above any possible debris start your new machine and turn the idle up to a strong fast idle. Let your machine run this way for 15 minutes. Remove the boat from the trailer and let it sit in the water while you park the trailer and unload all your stuff from your tow vehicle. Get out the owners manual and read it all the way through twice! By now the boat should be cooling down fairly well. Get out your good book and enjoy!! Relax and dream of what the upcoming season has in store for you, when you have achieved a Zen-like trance feel the engine again and see if it has cooled all the way down.

    Stage two:
    Put on your life vest and take your craft into at least knee deep water, push up and down vigorously on the rear of it to clear any possible debris from the pump and intake grate. Now comes the part where that Zen-like patience and good sense come in to play. Start the boat (after returning the idle to normal position) and proceed slowly out into the waterway, do not get the boat up on a plane yet! Use only enough throttle to start to break plane and then back off. Repeat this over and over again until you have been running for about twenty minutes, when you have reached the twenty minute mark get out that book and relax!! I am sure you know what to do next...Relax some more, only when the engine has returned to ambient temperature should you proceed.

    Stage three:
    By now your boat has cooled all the way down right?! Put back on your pfd and ride it at just over a quarter throttle setting and vary the rpm's up and down. Do this for an additional twenty minutes or so.

    Stage four:
    Have you finished that book yet? If you have, then your boat must be cooled off and eagerly waiting for you to go to step four! Take the boat out and go up and down the rpm range up to but not over half throttle. Do this for twenty minutes and....you guessed it let it cool off again!!!!!

    Stage five:
    Take your completely cooled off boat out one more time and go up and down the rpm range up to three quarters throttle with an occasional blast up to full throttle (not over three seconds). Ride this way for thirty minutes and once again let the craft cool down one final time. By this time you should need to put in some fuel, I suggest adding just a couple of ounces of extra oil to your second tankful.

    Stage six:
    Go out and have a ball! I encourage you to have some fun with some full throttle blasts but don't hit the buoy course yet or engage in repeated hard turns. Take it a little easy until you have finished the second tank of fuel and "Ta-Da!" You have broken your machine in as well as it can be broken in and are ready to enjoy numerous days of bliss on the water!!

    Prologue:
    Since you have already read your manual a couple of times you now are aware of the recommended service intervals and procedures. It is a good idea to keep some sort of track of the number of hours you put on the machine so that your regular services are done at the appropriate time.
    Last edited by K447; 06-22-2015 at 05:10 PM.

  9. #9
    Will try that break in method. I really need to have some multiple use seasons with this ski, to justify the moolah spent on her! Thanks

  10. #10

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    I agree with the slowed break in approach, for what it's worth....
    That is how my father taught me and I still have my first 1969 Honda 50 mini-trail, his 1969 Honda Trail-90, 1970 Honda SL-100, his SL-175 and even my original Stihl chainsaws from 1974 all still run great.. I do it on all my toys and they seem faster than the "Run-em like you're going to" guys break in types. Only WARNING I have is,, If you take care of your toys from the start,, your gonna need a bigger garage to keep them all in. About 100 sq. ft per year seems good.. I'm ahead a bit 6600 sq ft and climbing..

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