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  1. #11
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    PRO785 Lord Mounts

    rgard
    785 rubber pipe mounts

    Mine broke.and after looking at them ..Well there glued together...which is junk for surf riding..... i bought these

    5823K21Natural Rubber Sandwich Mount W/304 SS Stud Cylindrical, Male/Male, 3/8"-16 Thread, 3/4" Height
    from mcmaster.com

    .the original mounts are 1 1/4 inch thick rubber.. i used washers to make up the 1/2 difference....the diameter of the rubber was bigger also...BUT i didnt have any issues with clearances... these mounts are 11 bucks and are a TON stronger than the 48 dollar mounts polaris sells..

    ps-- these screw right into the hull mounts...same size and are stainless steel


  2. #12
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    Primer Kit Installation

    rodney

    Last edited by ph2ocraft; 02-20-2007 at 01:08 AM.

  3. #13
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    Wiseco Piston Install

    rodneya

    SEA std ring gap .004 for every inch of bore
    Example: 780 Fuji .20 oversize you want a clearance of .009
    Last edited by ph2ocraft; 02-20-2007 at 01:11 AM.

  4. #14
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    Measuring Squish Clearance

    crazya
    How to Measure
    Your Cylinder Head Squish Clearance...


    The "squish" band is a somewhat narrow angle cut into the outer periphery of the combustion chamber that comes into a close clearance proximity with the piston crown outer edges at TDC (Top Dead Center) of crankshaft rotation. Measuring it accurately so as to make decisions about what modification(s) should be made to an engine's compression ratio and combustion chamber is a critical reference step in planning a high performance motor.
    To determine your actual squish clearance...
    You will need about a 10" length of solder of a diameter that is thicker than your current squish clearance. Common available diameters are approximately .038", .065", .090" and about .140". Start with the .065" (in tightly set-up race engines of smaller displacement you may need only the .038") and if it is not thick enough because your squish clearance turns out to be greater, just go up to the next size. IMPORTANT! IF YOU USE SOLDER THAT IS THICKER THAN NECESSARY TO MEASURE THE EXISTING CLEARANCE (Example: Using .090" thickness solder in a cylinder with .055" squish clearance, when the proper solder thickness to be used would be .065") YOUR MEASURED CLEARANCE WILL BE INACCURATE!!! If you get inaccurate squish clearance impressions, everything that is deduced from them will be seriously flawed. THIS IS A BIG DEAL, SO TREAT IT WITH PROPERLY DUE ATTENTION!
    Cut the solder tips squarely with a single edge razor blade so each tip is cut perfectly perpendicular to the solder length. This is also VERY IMPORTANT to get accurate indications from the very edge of the combustion chamber limits! Bend the solder into an upside down "U" shape with the "legs" about 1/2" apart and parallel to eachother. Now cross the "legs" over eachother. You should now have an inverted "U" of solder with "legs" crossed in an "X" pattern.
    Remove spark plug from your engine. Bring the engine up to approximate top dead center (follow the piston up the bore with another piece of solder stuck into the plug hole.......). Now back the motor up opposite normal direction of rotation until the piston has dropped about an inch back down the bore. Insert your two "legs" of solder into the plug hole while holding the solder by its' "U". Push and allow the "legs" to splay left and right across the piston dome INLINE WITH THE WRIST PIN AXIS. Do NOT push the "legs" fore and aft (front to back) in the bore or the potential for the piston to "tilt" on the wrist pin in its' cylinder wall clearance could give you false readings.
    You'll be able to "feel" the tips of the solder as they move left and right out to the cylinder wall limits. When you feel them touch the cylinder wall, stop pushing and hold what you've got with one hand while rotating the motor up to TDC with the other hand by its' flywheel or similar. If the solder is thicker than your squish clearance you will feel resistance as you reach TDC. If the resistance is too great to roll past TDC, select another length of solder of the next thinner diameter.
    Roll the engine through TDC and allow the piston to descend enough down the bore to easily retract the legs of solder back out through the plug hole. IMPORTANT! Keep track of which tip was at which side of the bore so you'll know which is which if there's a difference in squish clearance from one side of the bore to the other! Differences in clearance from one side to the other are common and can be caused by a "tilted" squish band in the head, "tilted" piston crown, bent rod, cylinder bore not cut perpendicular to the head mating surface, etc.. Noticing that there is a problem and which direction the "tilt" is will alert you to track down the culprit. Now measure the compressed tip ENDS (it is fairly common for the squish band angle in the head and the radius on the piston crown to diverge slightly, thus your "tightest" clearance will be right at the very ends of your solder) and record them. This is your actual squish clearance at TDC

  5. #15
    Moderator beerdart's Avatar
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    PSI Triple Pipe Install 650,750,780.

    Thanks sealion. I just put it together in one place.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  6. #16
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    Compression Ratios

    beer






    Attached Files Attached Files

  7. #17
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    Performance 2 Stroke Exhaust

    High Performance 2-Stroke Exhaust 101
    The purpose of an "expansion chamber" is to return to the exhaust port a negative sound wave then a positive sound wave at precisely the right time. If the pressure wave returns too late, you lose some of the fresh fuel charge in the combustion chamber and performance. If the wave returns too soon, it pushes hot exhaust gas back into the combustion chamber contaminating the fresh charge and creating hot spots on the piston.

    The challenge to the pipe designer is to arrive at the proper exhaust tuning that will return the sonic waves at the correct time. This challenge is made all the harder by many impeller/nozzle combinations, engine configurations, riding conditions and rider preferences.

    Traditionally, if you wanted low RPM torque and high RPM horsepower, it required several pipes. A few of our competitors cast rings into their pipes to achieve pipe tuning by "cut and try". In 1992 Factory Pipe introduced the first truly tunable pipe using our variable water injection system.

    This system allows you to modify where and how much water injects into the exhaust by the turn of a set screw. Where our competition had you change the length of the pipe, the Factory Pipe allows you to vary the exhaust gas temperature which in turn changes the sonic wave speed within the pipe. Changing the sonic wave speed within the pipe has the same tuning affect as changing the length of the pipe.

    Tuning Your Exhaust System

    Note - The following information pertains to Factory Pipe systems that use our "A" or "B" headpipe with three (3) water injection screws. Some systems such as the SeaDoo 580/650/720 and Kawasaki 750SS/XI have only one injection screw. On pipes equipped with ECWI use only the bottom injection screw.

    Most Factory Pipe systems have our exclusive "tuneable" headpipe which allows you to custom tune the pipe to your riding style. The following information gives a general overview of how this system works and how each adjustment will affect the performance of your watercraft.

    Double check all hoses, bolts and clamps from your installation. For the first "on-water" test of your new Factory Pipe we recommend closing the top and middle adjustment screws and opening the bottom screw 3/4 turn out from closed. This setting will be more water than is required but will provide a good starting point to test the pipe.

    Ride the watercraft for several minutes while varying the throttle position. Put the boat through a long series of slalom turns keeping the engine loaded. Hit the kill switch or pull the lanyard and let the boat come to a stop. Open the engine cover as quick as possible and check the pipe temperature by splashing water on the chamber body directly after the headpipe coupler. The water should lightly sizzle for the first few inches on the chamber body. If the water does not sizzle, close the bottom adjustment screw 1/8 turn and retest. If the water sizzles rapidly, open the bottom screw 1/4 turn and retest.

    This set up will provide the best top end performance for your watercraft. With the pipe adjusted as stated above, open the top screw 1/4 turn. This will cool the exhaust in the headpipe and provide better bottom end performance at the expense of some top-end. This would be an ideal setting for running slalom or a tight buoy course. If you want a change that is somewhere in the middle of the two settings, close the top screw and open the middle screw 1/4 turn or add another 1/8 turn to the bottom screw. Some engines may react differently from the above. For example, while testing the 650 Super Jet we found that we gained top end performance by running the top screw open and the others closed. You may use any combination of the three screws to achieve the desired performance. However, AT LEAST ONE SCREW MUST REMAIN OPEN AT ALL TIMES TO PREVENT DAMAGE TO THE PIPE.



  8. #18
    ph2ocraft's Avatar
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    NOS/The Juice











    Last edited by ph2ocraft; 03-11-2007 at 05:01 PM.

  9. #19
    Connecticut CrazyA's Avatar
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    Ring End Gap

    .
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  10. #20
    Moderator beerdart's Avatar
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    Race Fuel Mixing

    Race Fuel Mixing ( Blending ) Octane Mixing Chart.
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