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  1. #41
    PolarisNut's Avatar
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    I'd have to ask the guys with issues with 4200FC, did they ride the boat too soon after applying it? With the way it is applied to the pump shoe, it will take a week or more to FULLY cure. I've seen guys pull their shoes back out and still have liquid sealant inside...it's obviously not at full strenght at that point.

  2. #42
    USCME's Avatar
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    I too would like a little more detail here, cure time is yet another variable in the equation. Honestly I think you'll be alright using either, they both will be a pain to remove and both will seal the shoe effectively decreasing cavitation. Both 4200 and 5200 have been proven effective by many people on here. Through more reading I haven't been swayed one way or the other and don't think I'll be particularly going wrong using either.

    That being said, I'm considering using 5200 on the shoe and 4200 on the transom, we'll see...

  3. #43
    USCME's Avatar
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    I've gotten a good bit of work done and just now getting a chance to post it all up, so here it is:

    First, sealed the transom back to the hull. Cleaned it up one last time and gave it a good wipe down with acetone on any mating surface.


    Wiped down the hull too


    Then it was time to break out the 4200FC and high strength threadlocker


    Loaded up the sealant grooves in the transom with 4200; I didn't feel the need to go crazy with the sealant on this. I know a reasonable amount of 4200 in the right areas will seal it just fine.


    Threw some threadlocker on the stud threads and aligned it with the hull. Attached the factory nuts and washers on the inside of the hull and progressively torqued to 19ft/lb rotating around the transom squeezing the 4200 out.


    Once secured, I took a little more 4200 to the inside of the hull and sealed around the transom hose barbs.


    With the transom done it was on to the shoe. The dry fitment looked good so I broke out the 5200FC for this one. I know there is a lot of debate between 4200 or 5200 here. My alignment looked good so I went for it and hopefully won't have to pull the shoe anytime. At least I know the 5200 will hold up to plenty of abuse.

    I ended up making a new set of shoe brackets. I didn't like my original set in that I offset both of the holes for clearance around the tunnel which does not distribute the load as evenly as possible. Really, only the rear hole needs to be offset.

    These are the new ones, made from the same 1"x1" 6061 bar stock, just centered the front hole and offset the rear. Drilled and tapped to M8x1.25 0.75" deep. Checked fitment again with the new brackets before sealing and they were good, the Bridgeport provides great repeatability

    Tools supplied/necessary for sealing the shoe:
    -Your choice of 5200/4200 or other adequate sealant (5200FC for me)
    -Some kind of scraper/spreader for applying the sealant and scraping away excess
    -Plenty of rags/shop towels
    -Acetone or other high strength cleaner
    -Rubber gloves (not essential but I preferred them when working with the 5200)
    -Torque Wrench with a low torque capacity
    -Masking/Painters tape
    -Time and patience, if you rush this you will end up with a nasty mess thats hard to remove!


    Just as with the transom, I started by thoroughly cleaning the hull area where shoe goes and the shoe itself with acetone. Next, masked off the hull everywhere I didn't want 5200 to stick.


    Cleaned the surfaces of the shoe brackets and applied 5200, threaded my alignment studs in too.


    Once cleaned and masked I applied a liberal layer of 5200 to the shoe on all mating surfaces.



    Dropped the brackets in the hull and lightly pressed them down to stick 'em to the hull a little bit in preparation for the shoe install.


    Carefully aligned the shoe in the hull and lightly pressed it in place being careful to keep it square in the hull and pressed back against the transom. Next, one by one, I unthreaded the alignment studs and threaded in my stainless M8 hardware with some high strength threadlocker.


    Now, take your time! Gradually tighten the shoe into place squeezing out the 5200. Apply more torque every 5 to 10 minutes constantly tooling away the excess sealant that is squeezed out and making sure the shoe is properly positioned in the hull. I can't emphasize enough here how much patience pays off, if you just throw it up there and crank it down I'm sure you'll end up redoing it at some point in time.

    Worked my way up to 12ft/lbs and let is cure. I'd wait at minimum, a week before riding, this stuff takes a long time to cure when it's sealed up in the hull without any exposure to air. (I recommend waiting a week even when using the fast cure just to be safe)

    Here it is (still wet) after removing the masking tape and wiping away the excess.


    It's by no means immaculate but it is fully sealed and I managed not to get 5200 all over the place so I'm satisfied, and glad to be done with this step

    I always get excited about new parts! Got my new R&D 1200 grate from the greenhulk store in the mail


    I figure since I'm doing the shoe and going with a new grate I might as well do it right and strengthen my setup wherever I can. Prior to sealing in the shoe I drilled and tapped the intake grate holes to m8x1.25 instead of the dinky factory hardware.


    Also fabbed up this heavy duty intake grate mount afterhours at work. It is made from 1"x2" 6061 bar stock, machined it to accommodate the driveshaft hose and lightly radiused any sharp edges, drilled and tapped to M8x1.25 as well.




    I had to drill out the intake grate holes to accommodate the larger M8 hardware but not by much. I chose to use stainless button head bolts on the rear of the grate so nothing hangs down below the grate and socket cap bolts on the front of the grate since there is more room to tuck them up in the grate in the front. Stainless lock washers and high strength threadlocker was used on all intake grate hardware as well. Here's a comparison between the factory hardware and the beefier fasteners I am using.

    This in conjunction with the aluminum brackets for the grate and shoe will give me a generous safety factor over the factory components. I know my ski is mild now but I have no idea what the future holds so it can't hurt to go ahead and beef it up while I have everything apart.

    I had to remove the factory intake grate inserts employing a quicker method this time; the air hammer made very quick work of the yamaha green goop. It was literally 5 minutes to get all of it out! I used a pry bar and heat gun on the shoe inserts because I was worried the air hammer would damage the hull, but if you maintain a good angle between the gun and the hull you will be fine. I will without a doubt be using this technique in the future!


    Ground down the hex projections for the factory inserts and cleaned the area for securing the new intake grate bracket to the hull with 5200.


    As with everything involving 5200, a dry fitment was performed prior to gluing in the new intake grate bracket and everything checked out. All that was left was to bolt up the grate, and torque it down. I torqued to 12ft/lbs which is higher than the factory rating but alright with the M8 hardware.

    Pretty satisfied with fitment, the rear of the grate is flush with the shoe and everything is square.

    Bolted up the factory rideplate using medium strength threadlocker and the factory brackets. I don't see too many rideplates getting ripped off and I plan to upgrade to Jim's plate in the future so this will do for now. This also allowed me to get a better look of the fitment between the shoe and rideplate, although there is no extra angle in this plate, strictly the factory stuff aligned and bolted up as is.


    The plate was square with the shoe with the rear edge of the shoe just a little lower than the front edge of the rideplate.

    Thats all for now, I have gotten more than this done but this is all I'm posting up today. As always, all questions/comments/criticism/compliments are welcome! Thanks to everyone reading and commenting, there will be more to come soon!

  4. #44
    still kicking ass and taking names! Pale Rider's Avatar
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    Bravo!

    when you get to changing out the plate use thread sealer or 242 on the bolts. normally people don`t put anything around the holes, but I apply clear silicone around the boss where the bolt passes thru, this will seal the bolt threads at the hull surface to prevent water from wicking in and freezing the bolt down the road...


  5. #45
    USCME's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pale Rider View Post
    Bravo!

    when you get to changing out the plate use thread sealer or 242 on the bolts. normally people don`t put anything around the holes, but I apply clear silicone around the boss where the bolt passes thru, this will seal the bolt threads at the hull surface to prevent water from wicking in and freezing the bolt down the road...
    Andy, thanks for the tip! I have some thread sealant in the garage so I'll probably do that on this plate before putting it back on the water as well as when I upgrade to a better plate. A little silicone would help seal everything up better too.

  6. #46
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    Since my stock pump had a blown vein I ended up buying a used HO pump off of the forum; looking forward to seeing the increase in performance from this

    Started by breaking down my stock pump. Popped off the two bolts holding the steering nozzle assembly on first.

    Make sure you don't lose the small spacers for these bolts.


    Then pulled the four long bolts that run through the nozzle, pump housing, and then thread into the wear ring housing.


    Use the factory tabs to gently pry apart the three sections.


    I took this time to plug up the visibility spout on the nozzle; cut off the hose barb, drilled out the water passage, and then tapped to 1/8" NPT. Applied some thread sealant to an 1/8" NPT pipe plug and threaded it in.


    You can gain a few extra rpm's by removing the siphon bilge tube that extends into the nozzle, however, I chose to leave it in place for now until I get an electric bilge pump in place of the siphon bilge. I plan to install a rule 500gph in the near future and will take out the siphon bilge tube then.

    My 'new to me' pump came with the longer 30" driveshaft; which is the same as the factory drivevshaft that comes in the 2000 gpr. This is because the 2000 uses a shorter midshaft and no 2" extension.

    stock 2000 pump on the left, HO pump on the right


    The forum member I picked up the HO pump from was kind enough to throw in a factory 1300r prop for free so I'm going to run that for now. I don't yet have a pitch gauge to measure the difference but I have heard you can gain a little speed from the larger hub prop.

    Pump assembly is straightforward, just reverse the breakdown process. Some people apply a light coat of sealant between the sections of the pump, but I just cleaned up the mating surfaces and left it dry for now. Used a little bit of threadlocker on the long pump bolts. I'm sure I'll be pulling it again in the near future for more modifications. I already have a 2" extension but need one of the longer midshafts before I can run it.

    You must have a driveshaft holding tool for any prop installation/removal, set it up in the vice on the workbench.



    Don't be shy with the antiseize when installing a prop, these can be a real pain to remove after a good bit of use.

    Secured the prop into place and the pump was ready to go back on the ski.

    New driveshaft hose came next. There has been a lot of debate here as to what is the best hose. Honestly, the stock hose is so wimpy almost anything seems better. I went with smitty's recommendation here and ran the pvc hose with nylon reinforcement. At first I was skeptical of this hose, but upon inspection, it is very stout. It may not be as strong as the Gates hose, but it is still world's better than the factory hose. Wall thickness is 0.2" with 1.5" ID. It's low cost and availability (any Lowes/Home Depot should have it) makes it an easy choice. It takes a good bit of force to deflect the hose inward, even more so when installed. The stock hose could be collapsed with little to no effort. I'm confident I'll be fine with this hose, although I do plan to check it regularly just to be safe.

    There is no way to get it on without heating it up a little bit to get some more flexibility. I used a heat gun on the lowest setting and just warmed it up a little bit and then maneuvered it into place. Looks pretty neat too


    Here's one of my favorite shots of the rear of the hull, gotta love seeing the 6-layer carbon fiber tunnel and solid aluminum shoe and intake grate brackets with the new hose installed!


    Bolted the pump to the transom after this. Applied some threadlocker to the factory hardware and torqued in place, then hooked up the steering and trim cables. My factory bilge hose was pretty old and had a large crack in it. Some generic 3/8" fuel line is a perfect fit for replacing this.


    Tossed the waterbox back in and secured with a rubber strap and put the factory styrofoam back.


    Wrestling the sound suppression back in can be a little frustrating but not too bad if you can keep the hose clamps clocked in the most accessible position. I now see why so many people go with a free flow simply for ease of install and space!

    It was amazing seeing the home stretch and thinking about being back out riding soon! D-plate already installed I plugged the cat temp sensor hole in the stinger with a M12 oil drain plug and copper washer, this can be had pretty cheap at most auto stores.


    Stinger went back in following the factory service manual for torque specs and reversing cajundude's removal procedure.


    Battery box back in and CDI back in with two wiring assemblies clipped in and we're almost ready to go!!


    I pumped out all of the fuel in the tank before refilling with premixed fuel. Used my cheapo pump with a rigged up clunker on the end of the hose made from some scrap steel tubing i had laying around and a zip tie.


    Maneuvered the pump tube around to get to the deepest part of the tank and pumped as much out as I could get. I haven't fired her up yet, but I think I'll mix a 5 gallon jug at 32:1 to compensate for any small amount of fuel that I wasn't able to pump out. After running that through I plan to run 40:1. I'm a little worried about the first fire up due to the raw fuel in the lines with no oil to lubricate the motor for a brief period of time. I will drip a teaspoon of oil into each cylinder before the first start up to help with this but if anyone else has any first start advice when switching from injection to premix I'm all ears.

    Thats it for now and she's ready for the water this weekend or hopefully after work one day this week if I get off in time! I feel like I haven't ridden in forever, I'm sooo pumped!!

    On another note, I picked up a tiny tach and garmin etrex so I can get some baseline numbers and see how she's running, numbers to come soon

  7. #47
    still kicking ass and taking names! Pale Rider's Avatar
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    Sam, I have so many good words to say I`m tongue tied!...lol...
    Looks really good man!
    is the whole sound suppression back in? was it fun... I have a new block and going to do the same...

    that steering nozzle looks aweful, send me your addy and I will donate on of my spare plastic nozzles this it is great shape if ya want to get ya by until you get an sho or metal nozzle...

    Good job buddy!...

  8. #48
    Crash Test Dummy Smitty's Avatar
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    And I'm glad you got some pics up of the hose! Great job!

  9. #49
    still kicking ass and taking names! Pale Rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty View Post


    And I'm glad you got some pics up of the hose! Great job!
    I did check that out when at Lowes. it is some pretty stout stuff...

  10. #50
    Crash Test Dummy Smitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pale Rider View Post
    I did check that out when at Lowes. it is some pretty stout stuff...
    I've got a 2 foot piece of it in my truck right now that I could beat a confession out of an innocent man with.

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