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  1. #21
    bowsniper's Avatar
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    Here's the underwater bondo I was referring too.
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  2. #22
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    Heres the wool buff pad for the wheel.

    3M Superbuff Compounding Pads are double sided pads designed for compounding gelcoat and marine paints. They are constructed of wool with a built in light weight support pad. 3M Superbuff Adapter (05710) fits these pads to all standard (5/8 inch shaft) slow speed polishers.
    Compounding Pad

    Ranked by aggressiveness, Most Aggressive on top, 3M Performance Rank

    Fiber

    3M-05703

    Superbuff III Preferred (stiffer center hub) 100 percent wool 3M-05700

    Superbuff Better 100 percent wool 3M-05704

    Superbuff III 2 Plus 2 Preferred (stiffer center hub) Blended Wool 3M-05701

    Superbuff III 2 Plus 2 Better Blended Wool
    • Untwisted yarn construction allows for more surface contact, while giving excellent cut and finish.
    • Excellent for all paints and clears.
    • White colored pads, more aggressive for compounding applications.
    • Use yellow polishing pads such as 3M-05705 for finer glaze finish.
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  3. #23
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    Gel coat repair instructions


    Surface scratches can be buffed out of gelcoat with polishing compound, but deep scratches must be filled. When the gelcoat surrounding a scratch is in good condition, the filler of choice is gelcoat paste, which provides both filler and finish in a single application-but not a single step. Because the surface of the cured paste will be uneven, sanding and polishing are required to smooth the repair and blend it with the rest of the hull. Except for color matching, gelcoat repairs are easy and straightforward.
    Gelcoat Choices
    You will find gelcoat available as both a resin and in a thicker putty form called paste. For scratch repair you want paste. Repair kits comprised of a small amount of gelcoat paste and hardener, a selection of pigments, mixing sticks, and sealing film can be purchased for less than $20. Buy a flexible plastic spreader if you don't already have one. You will also need sheets of 150-, 220-, 400-, and 600-grit wet-or-dry sandpaper. A single sheet of each will be more than ample to fair all the paste in a repair kit.
    If you are repairing several scratches, add a small bottle of styrene to your list of supplies. Wiping each scratch with styrene just prior to filling it partially reactivates the old gelcoat, resulting in some chemical bonding between the old gelcoat and the new. Otherwise the bond between old and new is strictly mechanical-like a coat of paint. A mechanical bond is normally adequate, but the more extensive your repair, the more certainty you want.
    Color Matching
    The hardest part of a repair to the surface of a fiberglass boat is matching the color. Professionals who do gelcoat repairs daily still have difficulty getting a perfect match. Even "factory" colors don't match exactly after a boat has been in the sun for a few years.
    White has the significant advantage of being fairly easy to match, and once a small repair is buffed out to a gloss, shading differences will be unnoticeable. Matching colored hulls is somewhat more challenging.
    A color-sample card from your local paint store that matches your hull can provide valuable help. Ask the store clerk the formula; they custom-mix the color by adding tints to a white base. The formula may call for a half-dozen different tints, but the important ones are those specified in the largest quantities. You can use the tints in your repair kit to approximate the formula.
    Always color gelcoat paste before you add the catalyst. Put exactly one ounce of paste into a mixing cup and add the tints a drop at a time. Keep track of the number of drops of each tint. When the color looks close in the cup, touch a drop of the mix onto the hull. Make needed adjustments until you are satisfied with the match-don't expect perfection-then write down the formula so you can duplicate it for the rest of the paste.
    Preparing the Scratch Never try to repair a scratch by simply painting over it with gelcoat. Gelcoat resin is too thin to fill a scratch and gelcoat paste is too thick. Instead of penetrating scratches, gelcoat paste will bridge them, leaving a void in the repair. To get a permanent repair, draw the corner of a scraper or screwdriver down the scratch to open it into a wide vee.

    This is the time to wipe the open scratch with styrene to reactivate the old gelcoat.
    Catalyzing
    The hardener for gelcoat is the same as for any polyester resin-methyl ethyl ketone peroxide, or MEKP. Gelcoat resin usually requires 1 to 2 percent of hardener by volume (follow the manufacturer's instructions). As a general rule, four drops of hardener will catalyze 1 ounce of resin at 1 percent. The mix shouldn't kick (start to harden) in less than 30 minutes. Hardening in about two hours is probably ideal. Always err on the side of too little hardener. Also be certain to stir in the hardener thoroughly; if you fail to catalyze every bit of the resin, parts of the repair will be undercured.
    Spreading Gelcoat Paste
    Work the gelcoat paste into the scratch with a flexible plastic spreader. Let the putty bulge a little behind the spreader; polyester resin shrinks slightly as it cures, and you're going to sand the patch anyway. Just don't let it bulge too much or you'll make extra work for yourself.
    Scrape up any excess paste beyond the patch area.

    Covering the Repair
    Gelcoat will not fully cure in air. To seal the surface of a scratch repair, cover it with a sheet of plastic film. The kit may include sealing film. Otherwise a section of kitchen "zipper" bag works especially well because it tends to remain smooth and the gelcoat will not adhere to it. Tape one edge of the plastic to the surface just beyond the repair, then smooth the plastic onto the gelcoat and tape down the remaining sides.
    Sanding and Polishing
    After 24 hours, peel away the plastic. The amount of sanding required will depend on how smoothly you applied the gelcoat.
    A 5 1/2-inch length of 1 x 2 makes a convenient sanding block for a scratch repair. Wrap the block with a quarter sheet of 150-grit paper, and use the edge of the block to confine your sanding to the new gelcoat. Use short strokes, taking care that the paper is sanding only the patch and not the surrounding surface. Never do this initial sanding without a block backing the paper.

    When the new gelcoat is flush, put 220-grit wet-or-dry paper on your block and wet sand the repair, this time with your block flat. Use a circular motion and keep a trickle of water running on the sanding area. Feather the repair into the old gelcoat until your fingertips cannot detect a ridge. If the hull is curved, take care not to sand the repair flat.
    Abandon the block and switch to 400-grit wet-or-dry paper. Wet sand the surface until the repair area has a uniform appearance. Follow this with 600-grit wet-or dry. Wear cloth garden gloves-the kind with the hard dots-to save the tips of your fingers.
    Dry the area and use rubbing compound to give the gelcoat a high gloss. Swirl a soft, folded cloth over the surface of the compound to load the cloth, then rub the compound onto the repair area. Buff it with a circular motion, using heavy pressure initially, then progressively reduce the pressure until the surface becomes glassy. If the gelcoat shows swirl marks, buff them out with a very fine finishing compound. Finish the job by giving the repair area a fresh coat of wax. If your color match is reasonably good, the repair will be virtually undetectable.


    If you would like a super detailed instructions applying gelcoat. this site explain everything in detail.
    http--www.plasticareinc.com-Merchant2-MSDS_GEL COAT-Gel_Coat_Guide.pdf
    Last edited by bowsniper; 02-07-2010 at 11:23 PM.

  4. #24

    paint code

    does anyone know what the paint code is for the green on a 1999 polaris genesis or where I can get it?

  5. #25
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    Wekcome to the HULK! I would ask in the general dicussion area or in the project section. This is a sticky for painting skis. Just kinda info. not much else.

  6. #26
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    Ok enough of the printed stuff. down to actually doing the work, Lets assume you have all the stickers off and the rest of the ski is pretty darn clean. your happy with it. Boy that took a while huh?

    Now the bodywork. on stress cracks:.

    First grind the crack out till it ends and a little beyond to make it go bye bye.lol That way it won't come back there anymore. There basically isn't one there anymnore. Now that you have that ground out, it should be void of all dirt,wet glass or stains. just nice clean fiberglass to work with.

    You want to bevel the repair the entire way. That means grinding a 45 degree angle into the crack on both sides. If you have a v-shaped grinding tool. it will do both at once.. If your good, you can do it in 1 sweep! dont go crazy, but deep enough to get the crack to dissappear depth wise and length wide. Very important! Both are done. I usually bevel the end of the crack into a little circle to prevent any directional cracks from starting. like a 45 degree circle. Never comes back then.

    For big stuff like opps-thru the hull with metal:

    Ok, you were a ding dong and slammed your ski into the dock and hit a piece of metal and it actually went thru the hull. Ouch! The size of the hole deoesn't really matter. They all can be fixed no matter how big.

    Same routine, grind all the nasty cracks around it out. taper the edges of the hole. by tapering I mean, when your done sanding, you should see a lip of good glass not sanded around the repair, then the sanded colored paint,then the glass. A real acute angle to it.

    Then make a template out of cardboard for the front. tape it on. go to the inside now, grind away the glass around the repair to rough it up good. Mix fiberglass to instructions, place wetted cloth over repair. squeezgee out the excess resin. repair should extend about half the size again out from the hole.

    Make 2 more patches but bigger this time. same routine. Abot 45 mins later,,,,,,,take off the cardboard on the outside. viola! theres your repair almost done!.

    Now depending on how low that is, you may want to put a little patch of glass in the hole to cover it and bring the level even with the hull.. Make another patch bigger to go over it. If its still low, that ok, fiberglass will expand after it cooks off., wait a day and youll see what i mean.

    The next day. All should hard as rocks. Sand the outside with 80 grit till smooth, leave it just a tad high, so you have something to sand still!.. proceed with 150 and 220. Use a small block of wood with the sandpaper to get the bondo to go flat. Your hand will run over it with sandpaper and not sand it flat.

    If its low now, use bondo to fill the low spots. Put enough bondo over the repair and a little further.. it will all sand down together. If sanded properly, you wont see any of the repair, and there will be a slight hazing of bondo that starts at the paint line and transitions into the reapir seamlessly. nice n smooth.

    150 it and 220 it. Put a ruler on the repair with a flashlight and run it back n forth to see if its flat. light doesnt lie! Repair as necessary till all is flat n smooth.

    Spray primer over repair, repaint again till you get smooth coats over the repair. Load it on! till smooth. 4 coats is good. let dry between coats for flashing of voc's.

    Sand with 320. if all is good, you wont burn thru, if you don't burn thru, your ready for paint, if you do burn thru, you have sanded too far. Or the repair needs work still. its not flat... or it doesn't follow the contour your sanding on.. re prime sand again after its dry... let it dry! Dont be in a hurry. you'll end up priming it again!

    For stubborn little pin holes n stuff like that. Use spot putty to finish it off. Sands fast. Prime over that too. Sand flat.

    Hope this helps the actual human working on this ski. lol It's hard when noone shows ya what to do. or what to use.. Any questions, just ask.I'm happy to help.

  7. #27
    bowsniper's Avatar
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    Grinding tools for crack n stuff big or little.

    The air nozzle in the pic below is used for blowing out all the dust from sanding.. get up close and actually try to ruin the body work by blowing it real close to the surface all over the ski. you'll be amazed of how much gunk you see jump out of voids n holes..

    Then of course, this makes more work for ya but ,,in the long run, the paint job will come out better. it wont pop and sink here n there after the sun bakes the hull for 50 hours.

    I have seen people just spray over it. Didn't even know the pitn holes were there.. But they are.. This is where you can use the spot putty safely. This stuff is not made for deep scratches or holes.. It dries fast and sand easily. use a light to speed up the process if ya want. I just let it dry. doesn't take that long 10-15 mins..

    In the pic below, the first two are a small grinding wheel and a sanding roll. Use something like this for small stuff. grind and taper the repair n fill. The next are round n tapered sanding stones. Great for smoothing hard edges and general contouring without hogging much out..

    The bottom one is a super duty all carbide spiral grinding wheel. serious stuff here! Not for beginners.lol you'll either cut yourself with it, grind out way to much. or just be a litlle dangerous with it. It can jump n get ya. if it touches you, it removes flesh instanly. get the idea? lol

    Actually it works awesome for just going up to a big chunk, hog it out, flare it all the way around and go deep enough to get to clean glass. About 20 seconds and your done. fill , sand, block.prime.paint.done.

    For a large area, and a lot of hogging(taking stuff down quickly). You grab your makita wheel, some 8" 24 grit, crank up the rpm's and get to it!. Glass will come down very quickly!

    Probably never have to go that far. But I have seen major damage from a hurricaine on a boat and we hogged everything down! then glasssed for days~!
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  8. #28
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    Just wanted to add a really cool tip when using fiberglass in a contoured area where the glass really wont go into that curved spot.

    This is whatcha do, Sand down the area first. The take a little bit of resin, add the hardener and paint the area where u want the glass to lay. Just a thin coat of resin should do.

    Let it set up about 30 mins. when its tacky, but doesnt leave a sticky print on your thumb, its ready.

    Then all you do is cut your glass to shape and lay it in the contoured area!. it will stick and not bend back up on ya. curves are hard with fiberglass. Use scissors to relief cut any other area that are fussy.

    Then continue with more layers in the same manner if needed.

  9. #29
    bowsniper's Avatar
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    Great Tip On Sandpaper..

    When you use sandpaper on a sander, it usually breaks right? or comes off the sander easy? what a pain huh?

    Cover the back of the paper with masking tape or duct tape. cut the paper to fit into the sander perfectly.

    It wont come out anymore,and it wont split on ya or break in half. saves a lot of money in paper!

    Even if you have to add even more tape on the sides where it gets crimped by the sander, thats ok. it will stay in there great!.


    You can also do this with cheap sandpaper where it usually breaks apart. esspecially when your going at it on the hull or topsides redoing everything.

    Then, when you want to do block things out. Grab a paint stick, and place on the back of the paper with the duct tape and tape it to the back of it. You'll sand flat then. never finger sand anything. it will put waves in the glass. always flat hand or block.

  10. #30

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    Okay, I am going out on a limb and am going to start purchasing everything that you said to buy and I am going to take pics of everything...first (of many I am sure) question, I live in south Georgia and it is winter now, I will be subject to humidity like no other in the summer, when should I spray here, should I go and ask a paint guy?

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